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5 month kitty doesnt respond to discipline?

5 month kitty doesnt respond to discipline? Topic: The bookcase store
May 19, 2019 / By Archibald
Question: Ok so I already asked alot of kitten questions about the same kitty. If you already answered DONT ANSWER AGAIN! I dont have time for negative answers. This is my first kitten, give me a break. Anyways, I got my kitten from a pet store(I know I should've gotten her from a shelter but I didnt know about cat mills then) Anyway, shes very scary. She runs from everyone, if you touch her she jumps. I did nothing to her to make her this scary. I kind of regret getting her, I wanted a cute little kitten who would play and be...normal. Not this. She can act sweet sometimes but shes most of the time scared. She jumps in the sink alll of the time and I try to like stop her from it but she just hides from me. Its frustrating... How can I get her to trust me? and How can I get her to listen to me?
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Best Answers: 5 month kitty doesnt respond to discipline?

Tricia Tricia | 1 day ago
The first red flag that rises is when you use the term discipline. You can train a cat to not do some things, but things like jumping in the sink sort of come with the territory. In fact, cats get into and onto everything. This is normal. It is when they start to break things it becomes a concern. But I suspect she senses discipline, so she fears you. And a five month kitten (and I hope she is spayed) has a lot of energy, and is curious about everything. And if every time she jumps on something or does something else you don't approve of, and you yell at her, you would expect nothing different then fear. So start by establishing trust with her. Most kittens cannot resist playing tug of war with a shoelace. Play with her with interactive toys, so she associates you with fun. Don't try and grab her, but engage her in play. When she seems more at ease, then try petting her. And the best approach is to come from the front, so she sees your hand, and a pet that goes from the head to the tail is how her mother groomed her. Now, once you have gained her trust, and if she does things that really are inappropriate, such as scratching or biting, then you can do some training (not discipline). And the training is usually done by saying NO and a short hiss. Hissing is how her mother trained her. But cats jump up on things -- tables, counters, bookcases, etc. They like to be on high. Oh, cats listen. It is just that they more often then not ignore what you want. They are not like a dog.
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Tricia Originally Answered: How to discipline 16 month old son hitting everybody?
Oh my goodness! Where to begin... First off, from one mother to another and being a preschool educator, please do not follow the advise from others that is listed here!!! Your son is only 16 months old, he does not have a fully formed brain, and therefore does not retain information about so called "consequences". Everything that I have seen listed here so far is punishment, not a consequence. Children this young should not be punished. They should be redirected. There is only one true answer to why children hit when they are this young. They want something. Whether it is a toy, or your attention, they will be the judge of that. It is called a mistaken goal. Your child does not have the words to say that he wants a turn with something (nor would he want to wait) or to tell you that he wants your undivided attention. As an example: when you are playing with your son and the phone rings, do you get up and answer it? If so, what you are teaching him is that the phone is more important than he is. I bet that is a time when he starts hitting or getting really loud. When you were sharing yourself with only him, it made him feel great. But as soon as you walked away the attention was gone and he wanted it back. It is a pattern that your child will learn very early and very quickly. Your child will feel unimportant and inadequate. It is interesting how something so simple can be so complex. Telling our children "NO!" is a big no no. What do you think he is going to start saying in about 1-3 months, repeatedly? "No" will loose all meaning to him, it will become a white noise. When you see your son hitting another child, I encourage you to go over to him and ask him what it is that he wants. You may be surprised- cause I bet that he will point to an object or to you. If he doesn't point, you may want to point to whatever it is that the other child is playing with and ask him if he wants a turn playing with it. Tell him that they can both share the toys, and right now the other child is taking their turn, but he can play with it in two minutes. Also tell him that when he hits, it hurts other people, it feels "ouchy" (or what ever you say when you get hurt). Do not force your child to say that they are sorry, because you will be teaching them to lie if they are not truly sorry. You can ask your kid if he would like to apologize to the other person, and teach him that when you feel bad for doing something to someone else- or when you hurt them- it helps make them and you feel better to say that you are sorry. When your child hits you I suggest that you put on the biggest pouty face you can muster, and act like you are going to cry. You can say your "ouchy" word and use your own words to let your child know that they hurt you. If the message does not get through by using body language and simple words, calmly walk away and let them know that you are going somewhere where you can keep your body safe because it hurts when you get hit. Also, as an adult you can take what is called a positive time out. You can tell your child that you are really sad, hurt, or frustrated, and that you need a time out. Also, I do not suggest that you hold your child's hands in a binding manner to get him to stop hitting you. I urge you to teach your child about soft touches that feel good. When you are handing him a toy, brush up against his arm gently. When he hands you a toy, touch his hand softly. While re-reading your description of contributing factors to this issue, a thought popped into my head. It sounds like your son is being incredibly territorial, and it also sounds like you may need to spend more time down on the floor playing with his toys with him. I'm not saying that you don't because I don't know- but maybe if you did more, it could help. You are a great mother. Don't get discouraged by what other people say. They should be minding their own business anyhow, and I am sure that the only reason why they are saying anything at all is because that is how their child acted, if not 10 times worse. I understand that motherhood can be frustrating, and no one is an expert at it. But, we as mothers (and fathers) do our darndest. Smother your baby in love and encouragement. And remember that he is just that- a baby. If he continues this behavior after he turns 6 years old, then you might want to be concerned. But for now, you have a completely normal child. :o) I strongly urge you to pick up a copy of "Positive Discipline For Preschoolers" by Jane Nelsen, Cheryl Erwin, and Roslyn Ann Duffy. Also, please look at a copy of the Mistaken Goals Chart, I believe it will help you further understand: www.creducation.org/resources/Mistaken_G... (it will open in Microsoft Word) Best of luck to you and your little boy!

Salli Salli
My kitten did the same thin g when we first got her. We have decided it was because she was traumitized because so many people took her out of her cage and cuddled her, and everytime, she just went back ino that retched cage. The sink is a place she is interested in for fun. If you sit on a bed or couch and watch tv or use a cpu or laptop then eventually she will come out s=and sniff you, do not make sudden moves, turn your head and lightly pet her and then look away, she will crave more therefore coming closer and closer to u until u have a cuddly little kitten!!!
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Nicole Nicole
Did you have her spayed recently? I neutered my Happy at age 4 month and year later he is still hiding whenever I have company. I got this plug in from pet shop and calm him down, worked wonders. Get it to help him with that disorder, you will not regret it. Good luck..
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Lynet Lynet
Don't be so hard on yourself! Kittens tend to be like that at the beginning, remember they can see things that you cannot and that will explain the weird jumping my cousins kitten does it and I'm like your kittens crazy but its just what they can see. http://cats.about.com/cs/kittencare/a/ki... I hope the link helps!
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Lynet Originally Answered: How old is this kitty?
I would say that this kitty is several months old. If he is a male, check his rump area and see if he has testicles (I sometimes call them "hips" for other folks comfort). If he has them, it is a male, and depending on their size,and from the picture, he looks to be about 5-6 months old. From the way he is being held, he shows he has size. The description you gave indicates he may be small but that may be related to nutrition and care before you got him. Using the hand holding him, though, shows that he is a good sized kitty - and seems alert. The best thing is to take him to a vet for a check up and write down all your questions before you go. The next best thing is to stop by your local animal shelter and ask them He is a cutie. If he is as old as we here think he is, the stumbling may indicate a problem. You did not say how long you have had him for us to determine if there is a bowel problem or he just has not gone. You can imitate what a mommy cat does by rubbing his genital area with a warm, damp towel or tissue to make him go. Or, if he is old enough, keep him in a cat carrier with a litter box. Since young kitties eat, sleep, poop,and play - try doing this right after he eats, wakes up, or play hard. He is a domestic short-haired tabby.

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