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Can a deferment be used against me for a subsequent drug offense?

Can a deferment be used against me for a subsequent drug offense? Topic: Never catching case search
July 18, 2019 / By Alwin
Question: I got busted for weed a few years ago and ended up getting a deferment which after my probation resulted in the case getting dismissed. If I were to ever get caught with weed again would that old case be used against me as a subsequent offense although I was technically never convicted? I assume the answer is yes just wanted to know
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Best Answers: Can a deferment be used against me for a subsequent drug offense?

Tia Tia | 9 days ago
You mean pre-trial intervention where you agree to perform a certain set of tasks in exchange for the charge being dropped? Here is my best advice to you if you do not have any convictions yet on your criminal record go get your record expunged pay money to a lawyer it might take $500 and get your record officially expunged once you get a conviction of any kind you can't get your criminal record expunged once your criminal record is expunged they can't use it against you but as long as it remains on there they can always pull it up in court and say he had a chance to get better and he misused it! And judges when they look at things like that tend to give you twice the sentence that you would ordinarily get! But if you have your record expunged there won't be any record! To go back on and say we gave him a chance and he failed it's really worth the $500 if you haven't already been convicted for a crime
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Tia Originally Answered: Will a misdemeanor 1 drug offense keep me from passing a background check?
"When you look it up under the court records, it still says that it was originally a felony, but reduced to a misdemeanor" The records are likely sealed if your case was dismissed. On a background check, the question is whether there are any criminal convictions in your record. Whether the charges dismissed were the ones you originally faced or whether they had been reduced first, the charges are gone and (based on that arrest) you are clear. "i completed this week long drug program, i don't even have to be there." Uh oh - that could be a problem. Your case has not been dismissed yet - you need to be certified that you have completed the program and stayed out of trouble, and that can always be tricky. Also, when you accepted the program, there may have been a provision that required that your case be kept unsealed even after dismissal. If you were never convicted of a crime, and especially if it's expunged - then you have no record, and you should pass your background check.
Tia Originally Answered: Will a misdemeanor 1 drug offense keep me from passing a background check?
Several things wrong with your question. If the case was reduced from a felony to a misdemeanor, then there was a 'plea bargain' and you would have pled guilty to get the reduced charge. Second, you can't 'expunge' something that wasn't a conviction. Also, you can't say that ' it will be expunged in a month and a half' as the judge has the final say. Something fishy here.. And yes... you WERE convicted of a crime with the murky fact you have presented.

Rosemarie Rosemarie
Sure. You can be tried and convicted of anything of which you were never found not guilty. So you have a notch just waiting to be used against you. The deferment fairy only lives as long as you're good.
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Myriam Myriam
Yes, it will be used against you. You had your one free life. The next time, nobody is going to dismiss charges because it is your first time.
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Myriam Originally Answered: How do I write the Dept. of Education for loan deferment?
You don't need to contact the Department of Education for a loan deferment. You need to contact your lendors and request a deferment. Normally on their websites they will have the form to fill out.

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