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Past 2 Week Notice?

Past 2 Week Notice? Topic: How to write a 2 week notice for a job
June 20, 2019 / By Fenton
Question: I put in my 2 week notice exactly two weeks from today. As of yesterday, my schedule reflected that, making today my last day. After work today, I double checked my schedule to confirm that today was my last day, only to discover (to my surprise) that Friday and Saturday had both been hand written into my schedule, without mention to me or consultation. Viewing this, I checked the next two week's schedule (which had been posted) to see that they've hand scheduled me for the next 2 weeks, as well! When I spoke to my supervisor about this, he simply said he would leave a note for Human Resources. Am I obligated to work past my 2 week notice (my contract explicitly said I needed to give them only 2 week notice), and should I still call them to explain why I won't be coming in each day that I'm scheduled to work? The only reason I say daily is because we are obligated to give a call if we aren't working, regardless of circumstance, and missing 2 days of work result in an automatic firing Essentially, I don't want them to tell my future employers that I was "fired", especially after I put in my 2 week notice. Also, the reason for my 2 week notice is because I'm returning to college out of state early, since my lease was cancelled without explanation, and I need to find somewhere to live. This is why I also don't have an address for them to send it to should I work the 2 weeks I"m scheduled to work.
Best Answer

Best Answers: Past 2 Week Notice?

Cyrus Cyrus | 2 days ago
Depending on where you work and what your state's laws are, you a probably not obligated to work past your notice. It may depend on what you meant by your "contract." All (really most) employers require new employees to sign papers agreeing to certain conditions for employment. This is not a contract for employment, per se. You may be an employee "at will" which means that either you or your employer may terminate your employment at anytime (with proper notice, per your/your company's agreement). If you are under contract, you may be required to work out your schedule, hand written though it maybe. That being said, two weeks doesn't always mean 14 days. Say you put in your notice on a Wednesday. Your employer may want you to work two *full* weeks which would mean that you would work until the end of your schedule two weeks later, 16-17 days, etc. The person doing the schedule may have known you quit while the person who hand-wrote you in may not have known. They may have meant to ask you and forgot. They may have been hoping you would work it anyway. And finally ... if it's appropriate according to corporate customs, talk to HR yourself. Explain your situation. They should be able to give you definite answers. Let your boss know that you won't be working those shifts firmly and politely. Also, you're generally not required to disclose why you left a job. You can simply say that you left to go back to school (the truth). The nitty-gritty about how your scheduling issues probably won't interest your future employer anyway.
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Cyrus Originally Answered: Past 2 Week Notice?
Depending on where you work and what your state's laws are, you a probably not obligated to work past your notice. It may depend on what you meant by your "contract." All (really most) employers require new employees to sign papers agreeing to certain conditions for employment. This is not a contract for employment, per se. You may be an employee "at will" which means that either you or your employer may terminate your employment at anytime (with proper notice, per your/your company's agreement). If you are under contract, you may be required to work out your schedule, hand written though it maybe. That being said, two weeks doesn't always mean 14 days. Say you put in your notice on a Wednesday. Your employer may want you to work two *full* weeks which would mean that you would work until the end of your schedule two weeks later, 16-17 days, etc. The person doing the schedule may have known you quit while the person who hand-wrote you in may not have known. They may have meant to ask you and forgot. They may have been hoping you would work it anyway. And finally ... if it's appropriate according to corporate customs, talk to HR yourself. Explain your situation. They should be able to give you definite answers. Let your boss know that you won't be working those shifts firmly and politely. Also, you're generally not required to disclose why you left a job. You can simply say that you left to go back to school (the truth). The nitty-gritty about how your scheduling issues probably won't interest your future employer anyway.

Audley Audley
Go to HR and give them a copy of your two week notice that you gave to your boss and inform them that you will not be coming to work for the next two weeks. You can't be fired because you have already quit. You did everything you are obligated to do under your contract, it is their fault for scheduling you when they knew you were quitting.
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Vicki Vicki
You don't have to call them every day if you don't work there. As simple as that. Go talk to somebody in HR and give them a copy of your 2 week notice (I hope for your sake you did it in writing). If they are dumb enough to schedule you for work after you have quit, it's their fault not yours.
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Shae Shae
If you gave two weeks notice two weeks ago, I'd disregard anything on your schedule past that. I would also give a copy of that notice to HR (in case someone there misplaced it if you gave it to them already).
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Shae Originally Answered: Two weeks' notice?
A two-week notice is just a courtesy. There is nothing by law that says that you must give the notice. Besides, many employers (depending on your position) will accept your notice immediately depending on the sensitivity. I wouldn't call, or e-mail. Save it until tomorrow. If you have the same problem tomorrow, then I would call and find out when you would be able to have some face-to-face time. One day should not make a difference.

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