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How much Water Fits in These Containers? (Square and Circle)?

How much Water Fits in These Containers? (Square and Circle)? Topic: Application and problem solving math
June 19, 2019 / By Dorris
Question: This is not actually a math "problem"... I really need to know this for real world application. There are Four Square Containers and One Circle Container, with the dimensions below. 1) Square Container (27Gallon): 29" L x 20" W x 15" H 2) Circle Container (20Gallon): 19.5" W x 19.5" D x 22.875" H If all the square containers are only filled four inches from the top (so the bottom is filled up, but the top four inches are empty).. [Or Reworded differently.... all containers are filled up from the bottom with 10" worth of water.) A) How Much Water fits in One Square Container? B) In All Five Containers Total? Thanks guys! So to be clear; The Four square containers are filled up 10" from the bottom (or the top 4" of the container is empty). The Circle container is also filled up 10" from the bottom (but there is greater empty space above as this container is larger.)
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Best Answers: How much Water Fits in These Containers? (Square and Circle)?

Catherine Catherine | 8 days ago
That's not a *square* container. A square is a 2D shape and you have a 3D shape. Even if you were to use the 3D shape (cube) that's not a cube because the sides have different lengths. So the first is a rectangular prism. The second shape is also not a "circle" container. It sounds like you meant to say cylinder with a circular base with a diameter of 19.5" This is solved pretty easily but I think you'll learn more if you try it yourself. The formula for the volume of your shapes is: V = (Area of base) * (height) For a rectangular prism, the base is a rectangle (length) * (width): V = (length) * (width) * (height) If you want the capacity of the container, use the full height of 15" If you want the amount of water if 10" deep, use a height of 10" For the cylinder, the base is a circle: A = πr² where r is the radius. The radius is half the diameter. V = π(9.75)² * (height) Again, if you want the capacity, use the full height of 22.875" but if you want the volume to 10", use that as the height instead. P.S. I also noticed you said "4 inches from the top" which is not 10 inches for these containers. If you really meant that, the first would be 11" high and the second would be 18.875" high. P.P.S. That will give you the answer in cubic inches. If you want that in gallons, use this conversion. 1 gallon = 231 cubic inches. In other words, to get gallons, divide the volume in cubic inches by 231.
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Catherine Originally Answered: How much Water Fits in These Containers? (Square and Circle)?
That's not a *square* container. A square is a 2D shape and you have a 3D shape. Even if you were to use the 3D shape (cube) that's not a cube because the sides have different lengths. So the first is a rectangular prism. The second shape is also not a "circle" container. It sounds like you meant to say cylinder with a circular base with a diameter of 19.5" This is solved pretty easily but I think you'll learn more if you try it yourself. The formula for the volume of your shapes is: V = (Area of base) * (height) For a rectangular prism, the base is a rectangle (length) * (width): V = (length) * (width) * (height) If you want the capacity of the container, use the full height of 15" If you want the amount of water if 10" deep, use a height of 10" For the cylinder, the base is a circle: A = πr² where r is the radius. The radius is half the diameter. V = π(9.75)² * (height) Again, if you want the capacity, use the full height of 22.875" but if you want the volume to 10", use that as the height instead. P.S. I also noticed you said "4 inches from the top" which is not 10 inches for these containers. If you really meant that, the first would be 11" high and the second would be 18.875" high. P.P.S. That will give you the answer in cubic inches. If you want that in gallons, use this conversion. 1 gallon = 231 cubic inches. In other words, to get gallons, divide the volume in cubic inches by 231.
Catherine Originally Answered: How much Water Fits in These Containers? (Square and Circle)?
The "square container" if filled with 10" of water will contain 5800 cu.in. or 25.1 US gallons. Four of them will contain 100.4 US gallons. As the other answer said, at first you said 4" from the top, which would be 11", not 10", so 10% more. About 110 gallons. If you're filling it with 10" of water, the round container will hold 2986 cu.in. or 12.9 US gallons Total: 100.4 + 12.9 = 113.3 gallons.

Annalee Annalee
The "square container" if filled with 10" of water will contain 5800 cu.in. or 25.1 US gallons. Four of them will contain 100.4 US gallons. As the other answer said, at first you said 4" from the top, which would be 11", not 10", so 10% more. About 110 gallons. If you're filling it with 10" of water, the round container will hold 2986 cu.in. or 12.9 US gallons Total: 100.4 + 12.9 = 113.3 gallons.
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Annalee Originally Answered: Should i put pond water in my aquarium to speed water cycling?
No, don't add pond water. Only put dechlorinated tap water, water prepared for freshwater tanks, or water from an established aquarium. But, adding water from an established aquarium won't do anything to speed up cycling. Beneficial bacteria doesn't live in water; it lives in filter media, on decorations, in substrate, on some plants. The only thing that will help you speed up your cycle is by adding filter media or a bunch of gravel from an established aquarium. Note that bacteria must remain moist with dechlorinated water or else it will die. It will also slowly die if it stops receiving ammonia or immediately die if it comes in contact with tap water. So getting a dried up filter cartridge or a filter cartridge that sat in water without a presence of ammonia for some time isn't going to supply the bacteria to your tank. You may be able to get a hold of some established media from a running tank if you know anyone else who has a fish tank. Ask your LFS maybe. You can add what are called bacteria boosters, such as StressZyme or Safe Start, but these haven't been proven to actually boost the beneficial bacterial growth in a tank. Some people believe they work, some others don't. Your call to spend the money on them or not. I don't know of any actual live bacteria sold in stores currently, but if there is one then it will have a very short shelf life and need to be kept at a certain temperature through refrigeration. If a bottle sitting on a store shelf claims to have live bacteria in it, it doesn't. By the way, I hope you know, that clown loaches are extremely social, sensitive, and active fish (not to mention, although they grow very slow, they also grow BIG). Even for tiny clown loaches a 10 gallon just isn't enough, and keeping one alone is cruel. Even if you got it just one buddy it will be happier until you can upgrade your tank to get it a proper environment and school. You'll also want to make sure he doesn't have skinny disease which is found in many clown loaches purchased, he won't live very long if he has it. Just letting you know in case you didn't already! Since loaches are sensitive, you'll need to keep a close eye on your water parameters while the tank is cycling, with a liquid test kit. You may (and most likely will) find yourself performing larger daily water changes in order to keep the levels of ammonia and nitrite as safe as possible. Eventually it will cycle but it may take a while. Good luck cycling your tank, and I really hope you'll do the right thing for your lone clown loach and get him a larger tank and some buddies.
Annalee Originally Answered: Should i put pond water in my aquarium to speed water cycling?
Do not do that, pond water has different bacteria than tank water. Just buy a water treatment that helps cycle your water or buy filter start. Both treatments only cost a few $/£/€

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