1004 Shares

Trying to teach my dog to heel?

Trying to teach my dog to heel? Topic: How to teach problem solving
July 20, 2019 / By Alisha
Question: I'm trying to teach my Lab/Beagle/Sharpie Mix to walk by my side while we go on walks. I hold the leash close and to my right side. But she loves to go and sniff EVERYTHING so she keeps tugging the leash hard. (In fact, after 15 mintues, my hands hurt sooo bad!) When she was younger, my parents would walk her with the extended leash and she would just zigzag back and forth smelling everything she passes by, engaged in her own little world. How can I get her to walk calmly beside me and not stop to smell stuff? Is this even possible? The moment I put her leash on her tail sticks straight up in the air and her nose drops to the floor. She's not a pup. She's 10 years old. We got her from the shelter awhile ago. Today, I tried some of these techniques while I was on my walk. It was funny because she would be so confused when I could give her a treat. She would bump into my hand before seeing it.
Best Answer

Best Answers: Trying to teach my dog to heel?

Uni Uni | 7 days ago
Here is what my dog trainer taught me to do to teach my golden to loose leash/heel: Leash in right hand, dog on left side. A few treats hidden in your palm of your left hand, and one ready to go between your thumb and fore finger. Remember to use happy high pitched voices, and lots of praise. Get your pups attention, and holding the treat down at your side, start walking forward. If your dog is food motivated (which most are), then it will begin to follow the treat and you. You can let her sniff the treat, lick it, and nibble it even.. But don't just give it to her. At first, after a few steps with her stay by your side, say good girl and give her the treat. Pull one out of your palm to show her there is another to work for and keep walking, while keeping her attention on your hand. Be careful where you move your hand, she'll be following it, and you don't want to accidentally trip over her. Make her sit when you stop walking. After doing this exercise for a few days, take the next step and start saying "heel" when you take your first step. Because the dog has been doing this exercise already and should be used to it by then, it will start to get "Oh, this thing we're doing is heel and I get a treat!" As training progresses, you never stop using treats, but you will start giving them less frequently and at more surprising times. You just use them a lot in the beginning so there is something to keep the dogs attention and work for. But after awhile they'll have to do more and work harder for those goodies that you gave so readily in the beginning. The best way to train a dog is to let them figure it out. By doing this exercise and taking baby steps you are allowing your dog to connect things together and problem solve. It stimulates their brains as well as helping them learn faster. I mean, don't you learn something quicker if you are able to figure it out yourself? One more thing... When training your dog (for anything, not just heel) always end the session on a good note. Never let your dog end on a fail, and never set your dog up to fail. This is why baby steps are important. ADD: Sorry if I confused you by using the word "pup". I call all dogs "pups"... Anyway.. This training technique can work for any dog of any age, really.. We had puppies from 6 months old, to dogs that were 10+ years old in our class. We all passed, but one very anxious dog that had been rescued from a shelter, and was severly abused in her past home. Even though she didn't pass, she still made great strides for a dog that came from her situation. :) Oh, and next time you work on this.. Make sure she knows you have the treat.. She probably will be bumping into and messing with your hand tho, because of that.. Just be sure to not move your hand in front of your body.. It may make the dog move too, and could trip you. lol.
👍 202 | 👎 7
Did you like the answer? Trying to teach my dog to heel? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: How to teach problem solving


Uni Originally Answered: What should I do about my heel?
Hello, First of all I am sorry that you have this pain it must be frustrating. It is very hard to tell why you have this pain based on the info you provided. Since you are very active it could be Sever's Disease. In order to get a proper diagnostic please answer these questions: 1) Do you have high or low arches? 2) Is there any redness or bruising visible? 3) Where exactly is the pain located in the heel? 4) Do you have "extra" pain when you first get up in the morning and take a few steps? 5) What kind of shoes do you usually wear? 6) Is it painful to the touch? Here are a few things you can do right now: 1) In general you should be completely resting your feet - try to take a couple days off from activity and see if there is some improvement. 2) Ice your heel at least 4 times a day, either by applying ice directly or by rolling a frozen bottle under your heel and arch when you sit down. 3) Massage your foot to speed up healing. 4) Wear supportive shoes. Again, if you can answer my questions I would be happy to assist you further. You can write to me directly if you prefer, my email is in my Yahoo profile or [email protected] Feel Better!

Ritchie Ritchie
initially work on your heeling in an area that she is use to and less likely to want to sniff than when you are going for your walk and she wants to "get the news" BTW heel is on the left side of the handler - this goes back when dogs where taught to be on the left because the "gun arm" was the right. IF you want to teach you dog to walk on your right that is OK just know that it isn't heel as would be expected in an obedience class or at a show. Work in short happy sections with a treat or toy encourage her to keep her head up and reward for the correct behavior often. Initially if she will walk with her head up for 2 steps without pulling that is success - then build it up to 3, 4, etc. ONce she can do it in the back yard for about 20 steps without pulling and while paying attention then incorporate it in a walk but go back to the 2-3 steps and build it back up - a young energetic dog will take a long time to want to walk next to your for the whole walk - after all it is there time to check out the world using the best methods. But in the long run it will pay off and you will have a treasured companion that is a joy to walk with.
👍 80 | 👎 5

Methuselah Methuselah
Yes it is very possible for you to teach heel and you should expect it to. RockstarMonday is right on the money! That's how I would teach it too. Other tips if he's a REALLY bad puller, walk the other direction when he pulls and call his name. You won't get anywhere but he'll learn to pay attention to you. Praise and reward when he follows you on a loose leash. If you can, get into a training class, you will learn a lot about handling your dog and your dog will get a lot of socialization it needs and learns to obey with distractions.
👍 74 | 👎 3

Joshua Joshua
Try the gentle leader,designed for you to walk the dog,and not the dog walk you. The gentle leader comes in different forms,and is not harmful to the dog,but it does stop the dog from pulling,zig zagging,and allows the dog to walk next to you Hope this helps a little.
👍 68 | 👎 1

Joshua Originally Answered: What's wrong with my heel?
Hello, First of all I am sorry that you have this pain/soreness, it must be frustrating. There are many factors for foot pain, the most common one is bad footwear and a combination of specific foot bio-mechanics which are faulty, like flat feet or over pronation. In order to diagnose you better please answer these questions: 1) Do you have high or low arches? 2) Is there any bruising or swelling visible? 3) Is it painful to the touch? 4) What kind of shoes you usually wear? 5) Where is the pain located exactly? Here are a few things you can do right now: 1) Ice your foot at least 4 times a day, either by applying ice directly or by rolling a frozen bottle under your heel and arch when you sit down. 2) Rest and elevate your foot for a couple of days. 3) Wear good supportive shoes around the house as well. Again, if you can answer my questions I would be happy to assist you further. You can write to me directly if you prefer, my email is in my Yahoo profile or [email protected] Feel Better!

If you have your own answer to the question how to teach problem solving, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.