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K heterosexual vs homozygous BB bb and Bb?

K heterosexual vs homozygous BB bb and Bb? Topic: Writing letter b and d
July 18, 2019 / By Jinny
Question: If you have brown eyes you're big B and blue or green eyes you're little b. So is somebody with brown eyes BB and blue eyes bb? Why are some alleles written as Bb aka 1 dominant 1 recessive? How can you have both a skin ant and a recessive? Does it go by what your parents have? Like if your dad's blue and your mothers brown you're a Bb? How can you have Bb written in a punnet square? I thought it'd either be bb or BB
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Best Answers: K heterosexual vs homozygous BB bb and Bb?

Fredda Fredda | 10 days ago
For the eye color brown/not brown gene, as well as for most genes, you always have two copies. One gene copy from your mother, one gene copy from your father. Because the brown gene is dominant, if you have even one brown eye gene, you have brown eyes. You could have two brown eye genes and have brown eyes- that would be written BB. You could have just one brown eye gene and one gene for another eye color- that would be written Bb and you would have brown eyes. Only if you don't have a brown eye gene will you have non-brown eyes- bb. If you have brown eyes and your mother has blue eyes, then because all the blue eyed people are bb, and because your mother had to give you one of her eye color genes, you have to have one b from your mother, and the other gene has to be B because your eyes are brown. If both of your parents have brown eyes and you do too, then you can't know if you have BB or Bb- your eyes would look the same either way. In a Punnett square you write one letter above each column and one letter next to each row, and then in each square you put two letters- one from above the column and one from next to the row.
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Fredda Originally Answered: Science homework help heterozygous and homozygous?
Question 1: TT - Ho Pp - He dd - Ho Ff - He Tt - He FF - Ho (Two capitalized or lower case letters is homozygous. One capitalized and one lower case latter is heterozygous) Question 2: BB - Blue Bb - Blue bb - Green (All you need is one dominant allele (capital letter) to exhibit a trait) Question 3: Tall - TT or Tt Short - tt (All you need is one dominant allele (capital letter) to exhibit a trait) Question 4: Rr (Spongebob) x rr (Oval-Eyed Mate) .....R......r r...Rr.....rr r...Rr.....rr A. List the genotypes for each: Heterozygous Round Eyes - Rr Oval Eyes - rr B. List the possible genotypes and phenotypes for their children. Round Eyed (Rr) Oval Eyed (rr) D. What are the chances of a child with a round eye shape? 50% E. What are the chances of a child with an oval eye shape? 50% Question 5: Patrick - TT Pammy - tt .....T......T t...Tt.....Tt t...Tt.....Tt Offspring Genotype: Tt Offspring Phenotype: Tall Head Shape
Fredda Originally Answered: Science homework help heterozygous and homozygous?
heterozygous is when you have two genotypes and one is a big letter and one is little (Pp) homozygous is when you have either both letters big or both letters little (TT or dd) BB= blue Bb= blue bb=green tall= TT or Tt short= tt the square would look like this RR r. Rr. Rr r. Rr Rr r so 100% would be Rr which is round and it is the same for 5
Fredda Originally Answered: Science homework help heterozygous and homozygous?
You know, you should really do your homework yourself. Homo Hetero Homo Hetero Hetero Homo 2. Blue, Blue, Green 3.TT, Tt, short: tt 4.Well, his kids have a 50% of being Rr, and 50% of being rr. (So, make half the square Rr and the other rr) 5. PAtrick is TT and Pammy it tt That said, ALL their children will be Tt

Darla Darla
Bb is heterozygous and brown eyes, because Brown eyes are dominant over blue eyes. BB or Bb = brown eyes bb = blue/green eyes
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Darla Originally Answered: Will a heterosexual always have that potential of going gay, despite how straight that person is?
I pretty much agree with RobE... but I would like to clarify some definitions: Sexual Orientation: Sexual orientation is a pattern of emotional, romantic, and/or sexual attractions to men, women, both genders, neither gender, or another gender. This is what Kinsey measured in his behavioral studies. Sexual Identity: Sexual identity describes how persons identify their own sexuality. This may or may not relate to their actual sexual orientation. In a 1990 study by the Social Organization of Sexuality, only 16% of women and 36% of men who reported some level of same-sex attraction had a homosexual or bisexual identity. So... my answer to the question is: There is very little or no creditable scientific evidence that sexual orientation changes, but sexual identity is fluid and can change throughout a person's lifetime. (RobE - We'll have to disagree on the causes of sexual orientation... all reputable, peer reviewed science says there is a genetic component, a hormones in the womb component and some degree of nurture... but the research does continue).
Darla Originally Answered: Will a heterosexual always have that potential of going gay, despite how straight that person is?
There is a continuum of sexuality, with some people more exclusively gay or straight, and then a great number of people who are bisexual in some way. It's also important to differentiate between behaviour - having sex - and innate sexuality. Many people have sex outside of their standard preferred sexuality choice, but this doesn't change them at a deep level, as they're likely still to have the same deeper interests. perhaps these people have always had a little bisexuality within their make-up. Sexuality seems to be formed early in life, potentially before birth - whilst there are theories that have research evidence behind them, there is likely still not 1 absolute cause. Potentially there is not one absolute causation for sexuality anyway - it could be a range of factors involved. For instance, there are many human conditions that are inherently genetic, but require environmental circumstances before they are develop from being latent to becoming active elements in someone's life. As a Psychologist I don't see evidence of sexuality changing fundamentally, though an individuals perception of their own sexuality may differ over time. In societies where there is great pressure to be straight this does influence some people to inhibit their own awareness and understanding of being gay or bisexual, and there are many mature people who transition to a different perspective as they mature. Did their innate sexuality change? I don't believe so, from having worked with many such people - it seems that it's their own understanding and acceptance that differs over time. The reverse situation may also be true of course. So, separate the behaviour from the more innate sexuality - many same sex institutions have same sex behaviour amongst their people, but this can just be an outlet for sexual expression or experimentation. Lastly, factor in how self-awareness changes over time too, even though someone's real tastes may be the same all along. Otherwise, sexual tastes do change, some people have curiosity about things, and this may disappear when they experiment etc. Hope this helps. Good luck! Rob

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