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Ok.breast feeding question? And be honest?

Ok.breast feeding question? And be honest? Topic: What is a research question and why is it important to eat
June 20, 2019 / By Ronit
Question: So I am already a mother of two, and I have another little boy on the way (YAY!!!). Both of my first children were formula fed. One had enfamil low iron and my little girl had enfamil lipil with iron. For some reason I've been thinking a lot about breast feeding lately. I thought about it with my first two, but i never even attempted it. Most people are women on here, so to be honest, I'm like a small B cup. I don't even know if i would be able to feed my baby, i guess thats why i just opted not to do it. After doing a lot of research, and knowing how expensive formula is, I'm really considering breastfeeding baby #3. Could someone please just offer some advice? Does it hurt? Will i even produce enough milk? Anything. Thanks all!!! Also, how often should baby be eating if I do breastfeed?
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Best Answers: Ok.breast feeding question? And be honest?

Monday Monday | 8 days ago
Breast size and milk supply are completely unrelated. I have a friend who is literally as flat chested as a child, and breastfed all 6 of her children successfully. My breasts arent very big either, and I've always had TOO much milk, lol. The first weeks of breastfeeding can be an adjustment. You may have some discomfort, but if its actually painful, its because of a problem. Baby isnt latching right, or you've got a clogged duct or something. Seeing a good lactation consultant or La Leche League leader would help a lot. From the posts here on Y!A, you'd think that all women are born with defective breasts and that breastfeeding is "impossible". If that were true, the human race wouldnt have survived! Drink enough water, and nurse ON DEMAND, and you will produce enough milk. Do NOT supplement with formula, or you will hurt your milk supply. Breastfeeding is supply and demand. Your body will produce as much milk as your baby is demanding from it. If your baby needs to eat, say 10 times a day for example, and you give them formula for 2 of those feedings, then your body thinks your baby is only needing 8 feedings, and your supply will go down. As far as eating frequency, just feed your baby whenever they want it. All babies have lulls and spurts in growth, so its impossible to set a schedule. What may be enough sleeping and eating one day, could become too little or too much next week. As long as your baby is having enough wet diapers, they are fine. (breastfed babies sometimes go several days without pooping. this is very normal, so dont worry if that happens. their poop should be runny and yellow after the first few days.) Tips for breastfeeding success: -Nurse your baby within 1 hour of birth -Continue to put your baby to the breast whenever they want it. It takes 2-5 days for your milk to come in. Until then, the colostrum is all your baby needs. Dont let the hospital tell you that your baby needs formula to "fill up". -Dont supplement with formula -Dont introduce a pacifier or bottle of pumped milk until your baby has a well-established latch, so they dont get nipple confusion, or become too lazy to nurse because the easy flow of a bottle spoiled them. -Drink lots of water -If you are having trouble, seek help from a professional. Issues with pain, supply, latch, etc., are typically easily resolved. Join this online breastfeeding support group, where you can learn more, ask questions, get help from other breastfeeding moms, etc. http://www.lilaguide.com/Groups/bosombud... Email or instant message me at any time if you'd like to ask more questions. Breastfeeding is an important issue to me, and I like to help other mothers whenever I can
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Monday Originally Answered: Ok.breast feeding question? And be honest?
Breast size and milk supply are completely unrelated. I have a friend who is literally as flat chested as a child, and breastfed all 6 of her children successfully. My breasts arent very big either, and I've always had TOO much milk, lol. The first weeks of breastfeeding can be an adjustment. You may have some discomfort, but if its actually painful, its because of a problem. Baby isnt latching right, or you've got a clogged duct or something. Seeing a good lactation consultant or La Leche League leader would help a lot. From the posts here on Y!A, you'd think that all women are born with defective breasts and that breastfeeding is "impossible". If that were true, the human race wouldnt have survived! Drink enough water, and nurse ON DEMAND, and you will produce enough milk. Do NOT supplement with formula, or you will hurt your milk supply. Breastfeeding is supply and demand. Your body will produce as much milk as your baby is demanding from it. If your baby needs to eat, say 10 times a day for example, and you give them formula for 2 of those feedings, then your body thinks your baby is only needing 8 feedings, and your supply will go down. As far as eating frequency, just feed your baby whenever they want it. All babies have lulls and spurts in growth, so its impossible to set a schedule. What may be enough sleeping and eating one day, could become too little or too much next week. As long as your baby is having enough wet diapers, they are fine. (breastfed babies sometimes go several days without pooping. this is very normal, so dont worry if that happens. their poop should be runny and yellow after the first few days.) Tips for breastfeeding success: -Nurse your baby within 1 hour of birth -Continue to put your baby to the breast whenever they want it. It takes 2-5 days for your milk to come in. Until then, the colostrum is all your baby needs. Dont let the hospital tell you that your baby needs formula to "fill up". -Dont supplement with formula -Dont introduce a pacifier or bottle of pumped milk until your baby has a well-established latch, so they dont get nipple confusion, or become too lazy to nurse because the easy flow of a bottle spoiled them. -Drink lots of water -If you are having trouble, seek help from a professional. Issues with pain, supply, latch, etc., are typically easily resolved. Join this online breastfeeding support group, where you can learn more, ask questions, get help from other breastfeeding moms, etc. http://www.lilaguide.com/Groups/bosombud... Email or instant message me at any time if you'd like to ask more questions. Breastfeeding is an important issue to me, and I like to help other mothers whenever I can

Linsy Linsy
Breastfeeding is based off supply and demand, not the cup size. I'm an AAA cup (yes, they exist, only I have to order my bras from the one company I could find to make that size and they happen to be in England which makes it very pricey with the American dollar). Well now that I'm 5 weeks pregnant with my first I'm more like a AA... but my point is I'm told even the women who are too small to be a AAA cup size can breastfeed, cuz it's more with the ducts and things than breast size. That being said, I know women who have tried to breastfeed and just found it too painful or they didn't produce enough milk to only breastfeed (not based on breast size though), and they had to supplement with formula. It will hurt at first, but eventually I hear it can start to feel really good. "Orgasm without the O" is how I've heard it described. Sorry I don't have any personal experience here to offer. I'm going to try to breastfeed with my first and if it doesn't work out I'll be forced to use formula, but hey, what's the harm in trying, right?
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Kamryn Kamryn
It doesn't matter on your cup size, your body has a supply and demand for milk production. For some breastfeeding is difficult, others have no problems. Myself, breastfeeding has been wonderful and pretty easy. Yes of course there has been times that weren't great, had a case of thrush but that was quickly cured with some club soda. BFing has no been painful for me either. I love the bonding time I get with my daughter, after it being around the house I treasure the time I get to sit down and nurse my baby. Breastfeeding is free so you wont be wasting any money when you try it. So why not lol.. If things dont work out for you can go to formula. I must say it is very nice not having to mix a bottle yet after at 8 months. Good luck, and hopefully you love it!
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Haleigh Haleigh
You will produce plenty of milk! Don't worry about your breast size...you'll be fine, I promise. Check out the website kellymom.com- it's a great resource for breastfeeding moms. As for the "does it hurt" question....... well, it's not a cakewalk at first. With my first, it was uncomfortable and borderline painful at times...but it got better. People will say "if the latch is correct, it won't hurt"....but if you've got someone sucking on your boob, it's gonna be slightly uncomfortable at first. With my second, it was a breeze. You gotta stick your mind to it and do it. Set a goal... start off with "I'm gonna do it for 6 weeks and see how it's going then"...then when you reach 6 weeks re-evaluate it. If you choose to continue, bump that goal to 3 months, then 6 months, then a year, etc. The best thing to do is read a lot about breastfeeding. There are various obstacles that you might encounter that have a simple solution- but most mothers are quick to just throw in the towel when they're unaware that the solution is so easy. Read up on it, don't be afraid to ask for advice, and if there is ever any issue you can't resolve- get in contact with a BOARD CERTIFIED lactation consultant (LLL will be a good resource). I specify the 'board certified' because sometime people dubbed 'lactation consultant' don't have the best information and they give bad advice. Congrats on the new little one and the decision to consider breastfeeding. It's the best start in life for you and baby & a decision you won't regret. Best wishes & good luck. Also, check out the 101 reasons to breastfeed. It's a good read! http://www.promom.org/101/
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Dolena Dolena
Breast size has no influence on your ability to produce enough milk - so don't worry about that. I think the best advice I got was to be confident that it will work and don't be afraid to ask for advice. It will take several days for your milk to come in but the baby is designed to wait and to nurse. When you are in the hospital ask the nurses for help or find out if they have a lactation consultant on staff - they can really help with latching on. If the baby latches on correctly it shouldn't hurt. There is this lotion to put on that keeps your nipples from becoming sore - totally worth the price but most hospitals give you a sample tube and it is almost enough to make it through. I'm not a zealous nursing mom, I was excited when I could get my son to start taking a bottle at 7 weeks so I could get some time away - but it is a really amazing experience, saves a ton of money and worth trying.
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Carly Carly
www.kellymom.com/ Everything you could ever want to know about breastfeeding. One thing: the size of your breasts have NOTHING to do with your milk supply, you didn't think to ask any questions the last 2 times? I do not judge, I am all about the mom's right to breastfeed or not to breastfeed, but I am a bigger believer in making an informed choice...I don't understand how so many women are having babies and not reading everything they can get their hands on for information! I am so glad you are looking into it now, breastfeeding can be such a rewarding experience, but it does take practice. Go on the website I listed and read read read. Good luck.
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Anette Anette
cup size has nothing to with how much milk you can produce. It can hurt at first, but get some Lansinoh ointment and use it after each feeding. And the biggest thing is to relax, if you tense up your milk won't drop. Just go into breastfeeding knowing you CAN do it, if you start out thinking you'll have trouble you probably will. Also nurse within the first hour if possible, the baby will be more receptive to it. Good Luck!
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Anette Originally Answered: Honesty in CV - how honest is too honest?
I would honestly say that you should draw the line at admitting to being a slob. Do not pussyfoot around the truth, but don't blast yourself in the name of honesty. Tell the employers that you hit a rough patch (they don't need the gory details of how rough) and that you want to get your life back on track. It would help if you could go back to school, but, if school is not for you, then just be honest about that, too. A CV is a document to sell yourself. Sell your strong points, admit to your weak points without being too down on yourself and don't expect to land your dream job right away. Work your way through a couple of crappy jobs to get some experience, then you will be better prepared for the better jobs.

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