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Ephesians 2:9 says that we are not saved by good works, lest any man should boast, but?

Ephesians 2:9 says that we are not saved by good works, lest any man should boast, but? Topic: How to write a personal statement for law
April 19, 2019 / By Cletis
Question: ...isn't accepting Jesus as your personal Savior a good work? Either way, it's certainly something every Christian I've ever met loves to boast about.
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Best Answers: Ephesians 2:9 says that we are not saved by good works, lest any man should boast, but?

Ananiah Ananiah | 5 days ago
what some have claimed is a disagreement between the apostle Paul and James. At Ephesians 2:8, 9, Paul says that Christians are saved by faith, not by works. He says: “You have been saved through faith not owing to works.” James, however, insists on the importance of works. He writes: “As the body without spirit is dead, so also faith without works is dead.” (James 2:26) How can these two statements be reconciled? Considering the context of Paul’s words, we find that one statement complements the other. The apostle Paul is referring to the efforts of the Jews to keep the Mosaic Law. They believed that if they kept the Law in all its details, they would be righteous. Paul pointed out that this was impossible. We can never become righteous and thus deserve salvation by our own works, for we are inherently sinful. We can only be saved by faith in Jesus’ ransom sacrifice. James, however, adds the vital point that faith in itself is valueless if not supported by actions. A person who claims to have faith in Jesus should prove it by what he does. An inactive faith is a dead faith and will not lead to salvation. The apostle Paul was in full agreement with this, and he often mentions the kinds of works that Christians should engage in to demonstrate their faith. For example, to the Romans he wrote: “With the heart one exercises faith for righteousness, but with the mouth one makes public declaration for salvation.” Making a “public declaration” sharing our faith with others is vital for salvation. No work, however, that a Christian can do, and certainly no effort to fulfill the Law of Moses, will earn him the right to everlasting life. This is “the gift God gives” to those who exercise faith. Sometimes the Bible writers wrote about the same event from different viewpoints, or they presented their accounts in different ways. When these differences are taken into consideration, further apparent contradictions are easy to resolve. An example of this is in Numbers 35:14, where Moses speaks of the territory east of the Jordan as “on this side of the Jordan.” Joshua, however, speaking of land to the east of the Jordan, called it “the other side of the Jordan.” Which is correct? both are correct. According to the account in Numbers, the Israelites had not yet crossed the Jordan River into the Promised Land, so to them east of the Jordan was “this side.” But Joshua had already crossed the Jordan. He was now, physically, west of the river, in the land of Canaan. So east of the Jordan was, for him, “the other side.”
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Ananiah Originally Answered: Ephesians 2:9 says that we are not saved by good works, lest any man should boast, but?
what some have claimed is a disagreement between the apostle Paul and James. At Ephesians 2:8, 9, Paul says that Christians are saved by faith, not by works. He says: “You have been saved through faith not owing to works.” James, however, insists on the importance of works. He writes: “As the body without spirit is dead, so also faith without works is dead.” (James 2:26) How can these two statements be reconciled? Considering the context of Paul’s words, we find that one statement complements the other. The apostle Paul is referring to the efforts of the Jews to keep the Mosaic Law. They believed that if they kept the Law in all its details, they would be righteous. Paul pointed out that this was impossible. We can never become righteous and thus deserve salvation by our own works, for we are inherently sinful. We can only be saved by faith in Jesus’ ransom sacrifice. James, however, adds the vital point that faith in itself is valueless if not supported by actions. A person who claims to have faith in Jesus should prove it by what he does. An inactive faith is a dead faith and will not lead to salvation. The apostle Paul was in full agreement with this, and he often mentions the kinds of works that Christians should engage in to demonstrate their faith. For example, to the Romans he wrote: “With the heart one exercises faith for righteousness, but with the mouth one makes public declaration for salvation.” Making a “public declaration” sharing our faith with others is vital for salvation. No work, however, that a Christian can do, and certainly no effort to fulfill the Law of Moses, will earn him the right to everlasting life. This is “the gift God gives” to those who exercise faith. Sometimes the Bible writers wrote about the same event from different viewpoints, or they presented their accounts in different ways. When these differences are taken into consideration, further apparent contradictions are easy to resolve. An example of this is in Numbers 35:14, where Moses speaks of the territory east of the Jordan as “on this side of the Jordan.” Joshua, however, speaking of land to the east of the Jordan, called it “the other side of the Jordan.” Which is correct? both are correct. According to the account in Numbers, the Israelites had not yet crossed the Jordan River into the Promised Land, so to them east of the Jordan was “this side.” But Joshua had already crossed the Jordan. He was now, physically, west of the river, in the land of Canaan. So east of the Jordan was, for him, “the other side.”

Topsy Topsy
Even the Apostle Paul said, "Let him who boasts, boast in the Lord", so if they are boasting of what God has done for them, well, isn't that a GOOD thing? We cannot even take any credit for coming to Christ as Christ said, "No man can come to me unless the Father draw him". We literally can take absolutely NO CREDIT for accepting our salvation.
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Ryanne Ryanne
It was how Jesus answered a similar question which is rather enlightening: John 6 28 Then they asked him, “What must we do to do the works God requires?” 29 Jesus answered, “The work of God is this: to believe (pisteuo- to trust in; to have confidence in) in the one he has sent.” Yes, it's a work as there is action involved in order for there to be faith. The works Paul is referring to that James (the author of the Epistle of James), gets wrong. James was talking about works of the Law of Moses, which he can be seen preaching in Acts 15 and 21. So Paul and James were in disagreement. It's a mistake to try to reconcile them.
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Nena Nena
Read the next verse We were made FOR good works there is nothing wrong with good works, they just don't save
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Nena Originally Answered: What does it really take for a person to be saved from hell?
You must be born again. The whole "easy believe-ism" is a lie. And when some people try to sell it that way, other people become disillusioned about it. In reality, getting saved is not easy. It requires some real soul searching. A person must come to a very difficult realization, and that is that they are "spiritually bankrupt." And that there is no good thing in them. It is a realization that they are sinners, and hopelessly lost. Most people do not reach that conclusion easily. It is like a death. And it reaches their very core. Their heart. In fact, before anyone can be born-again, they must first die, in a sense. There is nothing "easy" about that. (I wish I could underline the part below that says, "For you have died.") ===================== (Note Reference Below) "If then you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth. For you have died, and your life is hid with Christ in God. When Christ who is our life appears, then you also will appear with him in glory. Put to death therefore what is earthly in you: fornication, impurity, passion, evil desire, and covetousness, which is idolatry. On account of these the wrath of God is coming. In these you once walked, when you lived in them. But now put them all away: anger, wrath, malice, slander, and foul talk from your mouth. Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have put off the old nature with its practices and have put on the new nature, which is being renewed in knowledge after the image of its creator." (Colossians 3:1-10) ============== (Added) I'm not sure what you mean by "Lordship." Jesus must be the "Lord" of your life. That is just another way of saying that you are not your own boss. When you are born-again, Jesus is now the "boss" of your life. This affects everything you do. It changes how you see things, and it changes your behavior. It changes how you think. I'm not saying Christians are perfect. We stumble, like anyone else. We make mistakes. But overall, we strive to stay on the right track. ============== (Another verse) "Because, if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For man believes with his heart and so is justified, and he confesses with his lips and so is saved." (Romans 10:9) -

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