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Do you guys know any african american tribes that had close relations with native american tribes?

Do you guys know any african american tribes that had close relations with native american tribes? Topic: Do it yourself dna research topics
July 19, 2019 / By Nikkole
Question: Do you guys know any african american tribes that had close relations with native american tribes? in early america? i know that slavery created a lot of bonds - but even before that there is evidence that native americans traveled to africa- i would like to narrow down some tribes- any thing you know would be helpful!!!! Additional Details this is indeed true i am taking a college class that is studying the relation and though there is very little research on it currently- dna has proved the connections- there is actual documentation on interracial marriages long before european encounters -- you might check out: "confounding the color line" james f. brooks "crossing waters crossing worlds: the african diaspora in indian country" tiya miles & sharon p. holland "afrcians and natives: the language of race and the evolution of red-black peoples" jack d. forbes forbes, in fact has written quite a bit on this subject, though he is a boring read and i was wondering if ANYONE ACTUALLY KNEW ANYTHING about specific tribes, or anything about the topic in general? please don't post bullshit answers about how this is not true- know something before answer.
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Best Answers: Do you guys know any african american tribes that had close relations with native american tribes?

Lynne Lynne | 8 days ago
no. where did you get this information? i'm an indigenous person from the east coast and we don't have any records of interaction with africans before they were brought here in slave ships.
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Lynne Originally Answered: Please help with this history question on American settlers and native american tribes?
Indians never really won. Seminole, The Seminole Tribe proudly states it is the only Indian Tribe in North America never to have signed a Peace Treaty with the U.S. government and claims to be one of a handful who has never been conquered. Cherokee, here in Chattanooga, Tennessee, there were concentration camps to hold the Cherokee as they were rounded up and the land racially cleansed for white settlers. the Cherokee were the whites' enemy, and President Andrew Jackson knew it and refused to enforce a Supreme Court ruling in favor of the Cherokee, and instead sent federal troops to help in the Final Solution. the Cherokee were attacked, marched away at bayonet point, and removed to "Indian Territory" to be out of the whites' way. the Cherokee are historically a conquered enemy people of the whites, and absent from Chattanooga for 150 years since the euphemistic "Removal" of 1838. Chickasaw & Creek The Creek Indians were a confederation of tribes that belonged primarily to the Muskhogean linguistic group, which also included the Choctaws and Chickasaws. The Muskogees were the dominant tribe of the confederacy, but all members eventually came to be known collectively as Creek Indians. Most of the Creeks descended from groups living in six towns: Cusseta, Coweta, Areka, Coosa, Hoithle Waule, and Tuckabatchee, all within the confines of the future Alabama and Georgia. These groups most probably formed the confederacy. Later, the Creeks established the practice of adopting conquered tribes and accepting bands fleeing from English, French, and Spanish attacks. By these methods the Alabama, Coushatta, Hitchitee, Tuskegee, and Natchez Indians eventually became Creeks. The Creek confederacy inhabited a large portion of what later became Alabama and Georgia. They, like other Muskhogean tribes, apparently migrated to that region from the west in prehistoric times. The confederacy was divided into two districts, the Upper Creeks, centered on the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers, and the Lower Creeks, residing near the Flint and Chattahoochee. In early historic times, the Creek population was variously estimated at 11,000 to 24,000, distributed among fifty to eighty towns and outlying villages. European contact had other profound effects upon the Creeks. Although Hernando De Soto's expedition in 1540 made the first European contact with the Creeks, it had little impact. A century and a half later, however, the Creeks became caught in the European struggle for control of the New World. Spaniards in Florida, Frenchmen in Louisiana, and Englishmen in Georgia and South Carolina all attempted to win the allegiance of the Creek confederacy. Sporadic warfare with Choctaws, Chickasaws, and Cherokees added to the Creeks' problems. By the 1770s the English regarded the Creek confederacy as their most powerful opponent. The American Revolution brought a new expansionistic nation to the Creeks' doorstep. In the first decade of the nineteenth century, the Creeks ceded some of their territory to the land-hungry Americans, but in 1811 the Creek council passed a law forbidding further land sales. Unfortunately for the Creeks, during the War of 1812 a group known as the Red Sticks attacked and killed several American families. The American government responded by sending an army under Andrew Jackson to put down the perceived uprising. Jackson and his men decisively defeated the Red Sticks at the battle of Horseshoe Bend and forced the Creeks to cede a vast amount of their territory to the United States in the Treaty of Fort Jackson, signed in 1814. Over the next two decades, numbers of Creek Indians moved to Indian Territory, after signing treaties exchanging their former homelands for land in Oklahoma.

Lynne Originally Answered: Are there still Native American tribes in the U.S.A?
huh? Central and South America have different tribes, go for a research about that, but they may have Native American blood though..yeah..There are some here in USA but most of them lives in Reservations area..yetttt, some of them are already mixed with Mexicans and Whites as well.....I've seen some of them lives in "Country states", it's where most of white people are and a few Mexicans as well...
Lynne Originally Answered: Are there still Native American tribes in the U.S.A?
Yes there are. The natives are all over America. Kansas, Alaska, Virginia, California, Nevada has the portion of Native Americans in the U.S. Canada too has large population as well. The Native Americans still exist. lol
Lynne Originally Answered: Are there still Native American tribes in the U.S.A?
Just do an Internet search and you will find loads of Native Americans. Oklahoma, Florida, New Mexico, Arizona, etc, etc all have tribes on Native American owned land.

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