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Can employer change employee's job title saying it's a mistake on the offer letter after emp has start working?

Can employer change employee's job title saying it's a mistake on the offer letter after emp has start working? Topic: How to write a lost wages letter
June 26, 2019 / By Galen
Question: I've started a new job in a new company for 3 weeks and relized the job tile and the job level does not match. The job level is lower than it should be. Instead of moving the job level up, the employer told me the job title is wrong and they need to lower my job title. They mentioned the job title written on the official offer is incorrect. They made mistake. Can they change my job title (lower the job title) and not meet the position offered after I've started working? More details: Yes, I am working in U.S. I relocated from one state to another state because of this job offer. Now they can't meet the position they offered. Can I ask them to compensate me for my lost in terms of time, money..etc?
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Best Answers: Can employer change employee's job title saying it's a mistake on the offer letter after emp has start working?

Derek Derek | 5 days ago
job titles or descriptions are for the benefit of the employer not the employee, in the US as long as you are paid minimum wage that is the only law that says how much money you make, anything more is between you and the employer.Offer letters are meaningless as well
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Derek Originally Answered: If an employee resigns to avoid disciplinary action, can an employer reject the employee's resignation?
You can't force someone to work who doesn't want to, so rejecting a resignation does nothing to solve your problem. If this person falsified legal documents, criminal law can help to punish this person if it is applicable; if it is not, then basically it will just take time to fix what this employee did to harm the business.

Benji Benji
Yes an employer can change an employee's job title or demote you at any time for any reason. You were just hired so I do not recommend asking them to compensate you. If you do ask, you run the risk of having your job offer withdrawn. If you do not like your job and make it known to the employer, they will waste no time terminating you and replacing you with someone else. At-will employment is a doctrine of American law that defines an employment relationship in which either party can break the relationship with no liability, provided there was no express contract for a definite term governing the employment relationship and that the employer does not belong to a collective bargaining group (i.e., has not recognized a union). Under this legal doctrine: “any hiring is presumed to be "at will"; that is, the employer is free to discharge individuals "for good cause, or bad cause, or no cause at all," and the employee is equally free to quit, strike, or otherwise cease work.
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Abe Abe
If you're in the US, yes they legally can. Things change. You say they can't retract the job offer when you're already there. What's your basis for that statement? If you're relying on the offer letter, that won't do it. An offer letter is not some sort of forever contract.
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Shona Shona
The law doesn't care one bit what they call your job. Are you being paid what you were promised? If so there is nothing you can do about it. If not then you may have an issue depending on the wording of the offer letter.
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Shona Originally Answered: Employee benefits for small business - How do I start?
You can get quotes from ehealthinsurance.com, healthinsurance.org, Aetna.com, and humana.com There are several other companies that will give you quotes. You just need to search health insurance and fill in the blanks or make some phone calls.

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