2772 Shares

Is the Air Force a good option for trying to become a Nurse or Physician Asst?

Is the Air Force a good option for trying to become a Nurse or Physician Asst? Topic: A research nurse
July 20, 2019 / By Adrea
Question: I am currently awaiting entry into a Nursing program however the wait is 2 years. I am attempting to become a nurse as a means to gain experience and knowledge in a healthcare setting in hopes of ultimately becoming a Physician Assistant. I've done a little research but would like to know if the Air Force could be a good option. I have a friend in the USAF now and a retired Colonel grandfather so my interest in serving aligns with my education plans. Even if I didn't gain my degree(s) through the USAF, I would consider joining after obtaining them through traditional means.
Best Answer

Best Answers: Is the Air Force a good option for trying to become a Nurse or Physician Asst?

Terance Terance | 4 days ago
Heck yes! I know a few nurses.. and a few USAF.. not the same folks, though. Nurses in today's market cannot find work unless they have good training & significant experience. Check your local job ads for RN and PA jobs.. all require 3-5 years of specialized experience. Any of the forces (I like AF best) will give you an excellent -opportunity- for education, training, and experience. If you follow through and make the most of it, you will have a great start on a career.
👍 236 | 👎 4
Did you like the answer? Is the Air Force a good option for trying to become a Nurse or Physician Asst? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: A research nurse


Terance Originally Answered: Can I be an enlisted nurse in the Air Force or Navy?
No. As enlisted, the best you could achieve is Corpsman. Nursing is a degree position therefore it is an Officer's ranking and not an enlisted one. Every job you listed requires an advanced education (college degree) and is therefore limited to officers and not available to enlisted ranks other than in support positions (secretaries and filing clerks). You seem to be having Champagne dreams on a beer budget. Do some serious research on what you want or you WILL be highly disappointed on what you end up with.
Terance Originally Answered: Can I be an enlisted nurse in the Air Force or Navy?
I'm a junior in high school and I have been thinking about going into the Navy. I would go to college first and be in an NROTC program and study nursing. I would suggest going into a NROTC program first off because if you get a scholarship they pay for school. You get a monthly stipend of around $250. And after gradation you become an Ensign (officer in the Navy). They also have Air Force programs like this too. But I understand that school is not for everyone. I would stick with nursing because if you decided that the military is not for you...you will always have a job. GO NAVY BEAT AIR FORCE!
Terance Originally Answered: Can I be an enlisted nurse in the Air Force or Navy?
http://www.google.com/search?q=military+corpsman+lpn&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Pierce Pierce
Yes. You could use the two-year wait to take the "preparation for the major" courses, which would be biology, chemistry, calculus, physics (in most schools of nursing), human anatomy and physiology, two years of a second language, English composition and Literature, and any breadth requirements for the bachelor's degree. (My information is dated, you should check four-year-colleges to see if that's what they're still requiring, and look particularly at the requirements of whichever college you intend to get your RN at.)
👍 100 | 👎 0

Pierce Originally Answered: Difference between a medical physician, an osteopathic physician, a chiropractor and a podiatrist?
MD - four years of medical school, plus 3-5 years residency in a specialty DO - same as MD, but education also includes OMT. (Some DOs choose not to use OMT in practice, and thereby make themselves equivalent to an MD.) DC - four years of chiropractic school; limited practice DPM - four years of podiatry school plus 2-3 years residency; limited practice It depends on how you define doctor. Professors holding a PhD are also called doctors, but do not fulfill the same role as physicians. Generally speaking, only MDs and DOs are considered to be physicians. For example, if someone is sick and is in need of medical attention, these are the kinds of doctors they will most likely see. All of these professions, except for chiropractic, require the MCAT and personal interviews for admission into school and completion of a residency after graduation.
Pierce Originally Answered: Difference between a medical physician, an osteopathic physician, a chiropractor and a podiatrist?
interior the U. S. that's the comparable guidance even in spite of the undeniable fact that Osteopaths can do Chiropractic besides, that's, manipulation. Many will overlook a thank you to do manipulation and defer to the Chiropractors who concentrate on that variety of treatment.

If you have your own answer to the question a research nurse, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.