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How do I teach myself Japanese?

How do I teach myself Japanese? Topic: Lesson plan how to write an introduction for me
July 20, 2019 / By Mandi
Question: My school doesn't offer it, and I plan on going there when I am 18. I want to be able to speak at least a few sentences so I'm not the weird person that has no idea what anyone's saying. Lol. Is there any really good website that teaches you? Or like a rosetta stone for Japanese? xD. I plan on going to Japan, i mean. I'm already at the school. (:
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Best Answers: How do I teach myself Japanese?

Kimbra Kimbra | 3 days ago
I have a ton of stuff for you. I've been studying Japanese using these resources for the past six months, and they're just fantastic. First of all:http://www.timwerx.net/home/index.htm This site is my main learning resource. It has a really good introduction to the language, and lessons on verbs and adjectives amongs other aspects of the language.The best thing about it is that it's not written like a textbook-It's very easy to understand, and it's written by someone who really knows all the quirks of the language. Before anything, you should tackle http://www.timwerx.net/language/bitlang/index.htm and http://www.timwerx.net/language/particles.htm Then move on to the other lessons. Second of all:http://smart.fm/home This site is actually a "smart" flashcards site, meaning you can use it for things other than Japanese. However, being a Japanese site originally, it has many pre-made sets to help you learn Japanese. I suggest this one:http://smart.fm/goals/19053 It has vocabulary, and also sentences with sound files. I suggest reading at least the first 10 lessons of "Japanese Verbs" from the other site before trying this. Third: If you have an iPod/iTouch, you MUST get the app "Kotoba". It's technically a Japanese Dictionary app, but calling it one would be a huge understatement. http://kotoba.pierrephi.net/ If you don't have an iPod for this app, get a Japanese Dictionary. All this may look a little intimidating, but trust me, it's all really helpful :D
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Kimbra Originally Answered: Does Rosetta Stone Teach You How To Read And Write In Japanese, Or Is It Only For Speaking And Understanding?
It's Only For Speaking And Understanding.. But Learning Hiragana or Katakana is not as hard as you might think.. You can do what i did for hiragana which is go down each row day by day until you finish the chart.. Or you can just cram like a procrastinating idiot who forgot about his test next period.. technically it is possible to learn hiragana in a day. You shouldn't worry about katakana so much though, because it is so easy to learn.. (If you cram for hiragana it takes about a day.. while doing so for katakana only takes about 3hours..) Oh.. your on your own for kanji because i have yet to figure that one out.. Favorite Japanese Websites: http://www.japanesethroughanime.com http://www.genkijapan.net/ http://www.tofugu.com/ http://www.guidetojapanese.org/
Kimbra Originally Answered: Does Rosetta Stone Teach You How To Read And Write In Japanese, Or Is It Only For Speaking And Understanding?
You are not able to study Japanese on your own. You want classes. Watching anime is not going to aid. Watching cooking indicates is not going to aid. Going to web pages is not going to aid. You *want* a instructor. JapanesePod101 is not going to aid. Rosetta Stone is not going to aid. Nor is Byki, TheJapanesePage, Tae Kim, or another supply someone offers you. Why no longer? Because each unmarried considered one of them includes YOU identifying what is correct and what is fallacious. And YOU do not know what's correct and what's fallacious. You want any one who can truthfully grade you, right you, and aid you. And NOTHING out available in the market is ready to inform you what's correct and what's fallacious. They can most effective inform you the grammar laws and supply you a few sentences to memorize, that is certainly vain and a waste of some time.

Janet Janet
Go to Chapter, you will find quite a few self learn Japanese books. It helps you the basic conversation in Japanese.
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Janet Originally Answered: To Japanese speakers, please tell me the Japanese sentence (subject, verb, etc. I'm studying Japanese)?
Japanese doesn't have a strict sentence structure like English, you can pretty much mix up the words as you please. The only rule that really holds true is that the predicate is always last. (Well, copulas (aka linking verb) and sentence-ending particles can still come after them). Whatever "wa" introduces tends to be the first thing in a sentence. Most commonly, the wo particle is the closest to the verb. Meaning that: Watashi ha heya de asagohan wo tabeta. and Watashi ha heya de asagohan wo yoku tabete imasu. are both common, however: Watashi ha asagohan wo heya de tabemasu. is not as common, but not incorrect at all. Only the point of stressing has changed. The first one says that "I eat breakfast, in my room". (The main information is that you eat breakfast, that you do it in your room is just additional information). The second one says: "I eat in my room, breakfast" (The main information is that you do the eating in your room, what you eat being breakfast is just additional). This is also brings up the main point: Syntax in Japanese is not preset, the meaning often changes slightly (or to be exact, the focus of the sentence changes) depending on how things follow. Also, especially in spoken Japanese it is very common that the sentence is broken up into two parts. Like: Ah, I've lost it! My mobile phone... ああ、うしなった. けいたいを... In these cases, the predicate is not at "end". (Though it is technically at the end of the sentence and there is a second incomplete sentence amending the first one, adding the object to it.) Other than that. There are no exact rules. Only convinctions regarding specific grammar which you should learn when you get to that grammar: Examples: X wa Y ga Z. (X, viewing Y, is Z). Like:  わたしはあしがおそい。 (I am slow runner ~ I, viewing my legs, is slow) わたしはあたまがいい。 (I am clever ~ I, viewing my head, is good) Keep in mind that the wa part of this structure is often omitted. Y yori X nohouga Z. (X is more Z than Y) Eg: あんたよりわたしのほうがはやいよ。 - I am faster than you. X ha Y yori Z. (X is more Z than Y) わたしはあんたよりはやいよ. - I am faster than you (this one focues more on you being more than that exact person, rather than making a comparision) X ha Y ni K wo Z. (X's K was Z'ed by Y) (Z is a verb in this case and is conjugated in passive) Example: わたしはたにんにあしをふまれた。 (Someone stepped on my foot ~ I endured being stepped on my foot by someone) Conclusion: There is no Japanese sentence structure, you are more-or-less free to do as you please, there are some convinctions regarding certain specific gramamr which you will learn when you get to that gramamr but nothing universal.
Janet Originally Answered: To Japanese speakers, please tell me the Japanese sentence (subject, verb, etc. I'm studying Japanese)?
You know mother tongue comes out without you thinking. So we know about what is right and wrong about the words but we know less about the structures than that. I can give you a couple of examples. わたしは、にほんご を べんきょう しています。(watashi wa nihongo o benkyou siteimasu,) I'm studying Japanese. どうぞ にほんご の ぶん を おしえて ください。(douzo nihongo no bun o oshiete kudasai) please tell me the Japanese sentence. どうぞ おしえて ください。(douzo oshiete kudasai) please tell me.

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