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Taking that hunting shot?

Taking that hunting shot? Topic: Case shot
June 26, 2019 / By Zuph
Question: Let’s see how many hunters would take the following shots. The big horn sheep you’re hunting suddenly appears in front of you only 40 yards away in a small boxed canyon of just rocks and big boulders. You and the ram are surrounded with this rock. Major risk of ricochet. Would you take that shot? Big buck appears in the thick brush 50 yards away. You can just make out his head and shoulder now and then. There is a highway one mile behind that thick brush, several hunters are about and some cattle and you have a high powered rifle of some sort. Take the shot? There is a deer on top of a hill 200 yards away. Behind it is national forest for 5 miles. Take the shot? You’re a guide on a bear hunt. The client in front of you messes up a nice shot at 30 yards on an 800 lb brown bear, from the knelling position. The bear charges. You can fire over the client IF he doesn’t stand up. Take the shot? You see a deer running across a harvested wheat field 600 maybe 800 yards away. Clear back stop of field. Would you take that shot with a .300 WM? Thank you ben that a genuine honest answer and that’s what I want. I wouldn’t take any of those shots. As for the bear, I would move forward and order the client down and then fire.
Best Answer

Best Answers: Taking that hunting shot?

Solly Solly | 9 days ago
1: Probably not, I would have to be in the situation to really see how much of a danger the ricochet is #2: NO #3: NO #4: NO My story here but my friend's uncle was at one time a guide up in alaska. Story like this happened when he was guiding two guys. Dont remember the exact story but someone was getting ready to shoot at a wolf and somehow someone walked in front of the shooter right as the shooter took his shot. Wish i remembered the story better but long story short my friends uncle is still in huge court cases and no longer can hunt or own firearms because the guy got killed. #5: No to many variables for errors and wounded animal.
👍 106 | 👎 9
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Solly Originally Answered: How do you get a screen shot, on a mac?
Here's a list of virtually all OS X keyboard shortcuts: The Screen Capture items are near the bottom of the list.

Osbert Osbert
Q: "The big horn sheep you’re hunting suddenly appears in front of you only 40 yards away in a small boxed canyon of just rocks and big boulders. You and the ram are surrounded with this rock. Major risk of ricochet. Would you take that shot?" A: This shot would be tempting. But in addition to the risk of ricochet, there's a possibility of an avalanche or rockslide. Another factor is the question of how to carry the ram out of the box canyon. Deciding to pass up this shot would be agonizing though. Q: "Big buck appears in the thick brush 50 yards away. You can just make out his head and shoulder now and then. There is a highway one mile behind that thick brush, several hunters are about and some cattle and you have a high powered rifle of some sort. Take the shot?" A: No. I must be able to clearly identify my target and what is beyond it. The brush obscures the target and prevents me from discerning that my field of fire is clear. Q: "There is a deer on top of a hill 200 yards away. Behind it is national forest for 5 miles. Take the shot?" A: No. There's too much risk of the bullet causing harm beyond my target. Q: "You’re a guide on a bear hunt. The client in front of you messes up a nice shot at 30 yards on an 800 lb brown bear, from the knelling position. The bear charges. You can fire over the client IF he doesn’t stand up. Take the shot?" A: There's a serious risk of injuring the client. I would have to move laterally and get a clear shot before attempting to finish off the bear. This is a good scenario to discuss with the client ahead of time so that if it happens some sort of plan can be agreed upon ahead of time. Q: "You see a deer running across a harvested wheat field 600 maybe 800 yards away. Clear back stop of field. Would you take that shot with a .300 WM?" A: No. The rifles I own, and my own shooting skills, limit my ability to make this shot. I would pass up this shot and, if feasible, attempt to stalk closer.
👍 30 | 👎 4

Lennie Lennie
I'm not a great shot yet, so wouldn't risk many of those shots. Even if I were a good shot, I really believe in having a sure backstop. I don't like taking shots when I don't know where my bullet will end up, even if it is unlikely that anyone is there. So I would not shoot at any of the deer mentioned (the last one simply because it would be dumb luck for me to hit a moving deer in the vitals). The only shots I consider are the ram and the bear. The ram, I would only be risking my own life, and I don't think the chances are high at all that I would get hit by the ricochet. But I'd probably still wait to really see the situation before I answer for sure. The bear, I wouldn't shoot over the guy. My first instinct was to run next to him, a few feet away, and shoot from there. Make it so the bear couldn't attack us at the same time, a give me a cleaner shot. Again, I would like to see how far the bear is, how fast it's running, and if I'm close to the guy, I might kick him down, like someone else said. I wouldn't shoot over him, because I can't help but think that his instinct would be to stand.
👍 22 | 👎 -1

Jaimie Jaimie
1 Yes, I would put a shot in him assuming there was nothing to block my shot. Ricochet is not a concern because I can make the shot. #2 I probably might not take this one, but I may be tempted just for the fact it is not common for a bullet to go out both ways on a deep chest shot. #3 I would take the shot, no doubt. No one is in the edge of the forest all the tourist are at a gate of some sort. #4 No, I wouldn't. I have better luck running to the client then taking the shot. #5 I dont have the owners permission to shoot the deer in his property so no. Assuming the others are in designated hunting areas.
👍 14 | 👎 -6

Flynn Flynn
The first shot I would take because I do not have rocks in my area and am totally unfamiliar with bullets ricocheting off any thing but water. The big buck would get shot at in my area by every hunter that sees him. This is a normal hunting situation in my part of the world. The hill top deer would also get shot at, without a second thought. I would not shoot the bear. The client is definitely going to stand up and run like hell very soon.That's a given. I would not take the shot at that distance on a running deer. The first 3 shots I would take, the last 2 I would not take. Be sure when you pick best answer to list your choices also.
👍 6 | 👎 -11

Darwin Darwin
first one, your not in danger of ricochet, the chances of the bullet coming back at you after passing through the sheep are less likely then getting hit by lighting. second one, I'd wait until I have a clear view of the whole body, the chance of the bullet continuing in a forested area and hitting another hunter let alone traveling all the way to the highway is basically impossible. third, no, try to get a better, shallower angle. fourth, just move to the side a few feet and take the shot. fifth, no, I keep my shots within 400 yards, any farther is unneeded, wait for it to get closer. to answer SM's answer, yes, a late fawn will survive without the mother, by the fall, it's eating solid food normally and will learn from other deer where to find food.
👍 -2 | 👎 -16

Baldwin Baldwin
I have never seen a 180 degree ricochet. Shoot. If I am confident on the shoulder, shoot. At 200 yards, only if I have a steady rest. Shoot over the kneeling client? Probably freeze with indecision. I don't shoot at any animal at 600-800 yards with any rifle. The slightest error in range or wind estimation will cause an injury or miss. The typical 1moa accuracy of a hunting rifle is not good enough for a clean kill even if the range and windage is correct.
👍 -10 | 👎 -21

Wisdom Wisdom
I'll go ahead and assume I am allowed to hunt in each area mentioned. I would take all but the last two shots. I would never risk hitting a person like that, I can move for a better shot, if it means more safety from my bullet, and I don't trust my skills on a running deer that far away. EDIT: Never seen a 180 degree ricochet? You're missing out, here you go. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ABGIJwiG... Sure, it wasn't under the same conditions, and certainly not through a ram, but still a crazy ricochet nonetheless. Lucky guy, too.
👍 -18 | 👎 -26

Wisdom Originally Answered: If you get shot in the head does the bullet stay in head or go straight through?
not enough information to tell you. i've seen .22's go right through and seen a 357 mag not exit. i've also seen the reverse. the coroner knows the angle of the bullet's path through the body and from that can determine in most cases whether you're looking about murder or suicide. btw a gunshot would entering just behind the ear is pretty common in suicide. one of the first things i do when working an apparent gun suicide is to hold my empty hand as though i were griping a gun and attempt to see if it would be a natural motion to point a gun at the part of the body that was struck by the projectile. if it feels out of place it probably is. the converse of that is not necessarily true however.

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