3495 Shares

Question about travel agents?

Question about travel agents? Topic: How to make a research poster
June 26, 2019 / By Fenella
Question: so me and some friends are planning on going on a cruise next summer, and i was wondering how that whole travel agent thing works? cuz i know it's be easier cuz they wrap the trip, airfair, everything in one "bundle pack" but how much does the travel agent them self cost? also, what do they do? in terms of putting the trip together, do they like make a few different options and present them to you then you pick from them? or how does that work? then also, if you decide you don't like the offers they give you, do you still have to pay them for the work they did do to figure everything out? any amount of info helps! thanks!
Best Answer

Best Answers: Question about travel agents?

Cristina Cristina | 6 days ago
The majority of a travel agent's pay comes from commissions paid by the cruise line, airline, etc. HOWEVER, contrary to what other posters have stated, SOME agents DO charge a fee to book your travel. This is to keep people from wasting their time researching a trip, and then the client turning around and booking it themselves on the internet. Ask ahead of time if this is what the agent does. Some agents charge you to make changes to your vacation plans. Some are more willing to help you watch for price reductions than others. Some will charge you a cancellation fee. Good travel agents will ask you a lot of questions to determine what it is you're really looking for on your trip, and will then present you with several options. For example, by asking questions they may narrow it down first to a general idea of where you'd like to go (Eastern Caribbean? Western Caribbean? any particular islands on your "must see" list?) Then it might be which ports would be most convenient and/or least expensive for you to get to. Then, which cruise line(s) fit those criteria? Within those lines, which ship(s)? Do you want a ship with a lot of onboard activities, or are you sailing because you want to see the ports? Once you have it narrowed down a little more, there are choices of accommodations on a ship. In order of cost they are: Interior (no windows), Oceanview (window or porthole, doesn't open), Balcony/Verandah (sliding glass doors to a little balcony), or Suite (like balcony, but bigger and more lavishly appointed). Depending on a lot of factors, your agent might point out that a Balcony on ship X costs the same per person as an Interior on Ship Y. Your decision to make at that point... Do be aware that cruise prices are advertised "per person, double occupancy" which means that the price is contingent upon two people occupying the cabin. A person who wants a cabin all to themselves will pay as much as double that advertised price. Some cabins can sleep more than two people, and when they do, the prices for the additional people is generally less than that advertised price. The most you can generally put in a cabin is 4, unless you get some of the really high-end suites.
👍 160 | 👎 6
Did you like the answer? Question about travel agents? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: How to make a research poster


Cristina Originally Answered: A question on agents & publishers?
Usually an agent takes 15% of a writer's earnings. You do NOT pay the agent. Agents that ask writers to pay them are not legitimate. Real agents only get money when and if they sell your manuscript. The publisher gets the money, passes the writer's earnings to the agent, the agent takes his cut and then gives the writer the rest. An author's royalties and advance against royalties varies. 7-8% on cover price or 12-15% on wholesale are not unusual. This means a writer's royalties are often about 7-8% of the cover price minus the agent's 15% of that, for a total of 6-7%. If the agent succeeds in marketing the novel well, advances against royalties of $100,000 and up are not unusual. However, publishers are trying to cut back, so there will probably be fewer and fewer willing to give that large of an advance to a new writer--even with a great agent.
Cristina Originally Answered: A question on agents & publishers?
The industry average for agents is about 15%. Expect that's what they'd want. They don't get paid unless you do, and they get theirs off the top. If you're sending out query letters to agents, now might also be a good time to ship out a copy of your manuscript, sight unseen, to a publisher. It's a longshot, but who knows? You do have your copy of Writer's Market nearby, don't you? :)

Bettina Bettina
As the two people above stated, we do not charge an additional fee. We offer a few options after finding out more about you and what you are interested so we can find the best option. There is no commitment fee. Remember, travel agents work for you - if you do not like the options, please let your agent know what you are looking for and why. We do not get paid unless you book, so we will do everything we can to make you happy. Travel agents can also help book your shore excursions. The cruiselines depend heavily on travel agents, so we can sometimes get special offers or upgrades not available on the online travel sites.
👍 60 | 👎 0

Aidith Aidith
Travel agents do not charge the customer anything for booking a cruise. It is a great idea to use an agent for your first cruise, they can help you decide on the best ship, itinerary, and line for you.They get their pay as a commission from the cruiseline. Choose one that specializes in cruises not just travel in general. Rolling the airfare into a package is a very bad idea. The cruiseline has deals set up with the airlines that benefit them both but not the passenger. You get assigned the worst times, routes and connections. You may even miss the ship. They do NOT wait for you. I always book my flights separately and due to overbooking, mechanical, personnel and weather problems I always fly in the day before the ship sails. You all need to be over 21 for most lines. Please check that out with your agent.
👍 55 | 👎 -6

Aidith Originally Answered: Has a travel show ever influenced you to travel to a certain destination?
Yes, I watch the shows to get ideas for new and interesting places to explore. There's one show on RAI 1 here in Italy called Domenica in Villagio that features local festivals in various places around Italy. I've gone to many of them as a result of the show. For me, the shows are more useful for the lesser known places or events because the major attractions are widely covered in travel books, magazines, newspaper articles and the like.

If you have your own answer to the question how to make a research poster, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.