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The USGS slammed a study by the University of Nevada that a large earthquake will hit LA in the next 3 years. Are they right in doing so?

The USGS slammed a study by the University of Nevada that a large earthquake will hit LA in the next 3 years. Are they right in doing so? Topic: Nasa researchers
April 22, 2019 / By Norman
Question: The USGS is no stranger in putting out low earthquake odds in California. In 2008, they said, with 99.7% certainty, a 6.7+ would hit "somewhere" in California in the next 30 years. Turns out they are already correct because a 7.2 hit "baja" California (still technically a "California earthquake" according to the wiki) in 2010 -- just 2 years after the forecast (although there hasn't been anything since then.) The new study says a 99.9% chance a 5+ will hit "LA" in the next 3 years. I would hesitate to say a '5' is "major" but nonetheless the study was coauthored by a researcher from JPL (NASA) so is the USGS right in slamming credible people (NASA, University of Nevada, Earth and Space Science journal) in saying a 99.9% figure is simply not "attainable"? Sources: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/04/080414-AP-earthquake.html http://geodesy.unr.edu/publications/DonnellanEtAl2015.pdf https://www.facebook.com/USGeologicalSurvey/posts/955479124498071:0 @choko_canyon: No kidding right? @AndyF: In the pdf, they mentioned 6+ quakes, and the chances drop off significantly -- only to 35%. So they apparently have their eyes set on a 5-6 quake.
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Best Answers: The USGS slammed a study by the University of Nevada that a large earthquake will hit LA in the next 3 years. Are they right in doing so?

Kyran Kyran | 1 day ago
I wonder what the USGS idea of the chance of a 5+ hitting in the next three years? Perhaps 99.0? Maybe 90.0? Or maybe 70 ?. If the argument is over a few percentage points accuracy being unobtainable at that high of probability over a protracted length of time the argument is a waste of time and resources. I also wonder what % Univ Nevada puts on a much bigger 6.7 at this time. Maybe they are not as confident of their findings at the much rarer big quakes. When they can say there is a 99.9 % of a 6+ on a specific fault or area within 6-9 months then earthquake prediction or forecast will have graduated to a real dependable science.
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Kyran Originally Answered: Could I go to the University of pittsburgh for 4 years and then go to an ivy league school to study law?
Hey Sonyella, Kudos on starting to think about this so early on! I wish more law school applicants thought like you--they would give themselves a much greater chance of getting into a top-flight legal institution. Yes, you can absolutely attend the University of Pittsburgh and then go on to an Ivy League law school. I'm guessing that your concern is that U of Pittsburgh isn't "prestigious" enough to apply to Ivy League law schools with. Put that thought right out of your mind. I have worked with plenty of law school applicants from non-Ivy League schools that have obtained admission to top law schools. Your undergraduate institution doesn't have as much bearing on your application as your GPA does, so the fact that you would be attending the University of Pittsburgh doesn't really affect your admissions chances all that much. What WILL affect your admissions chances are your GPA and your Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) score. You'll need to have an exceptional GPA (as close to 4.0 as possible), and a 99th percentile LSAT score (172 or above) to really max out your numerical chances of getting into a top law schools. However, keep in mind that even with a GPA of 3.9 and an LSAT in the 98th or 99th percentile, you will still face some tough competition if you're looking for admission into a school in the top 14--not because you attended what you perceive to be a "less prestigious" school, but because competition for law schools of that caliber is intense for anyone, regardless of their credentials. In order to maximize your chances, I would suggest that you make every effort to finish with a GPA of 3.9+, and then spend considerable time prepping and studying for the LSAT in order to maximize that score. Aim for a 172 or above--preferably, if you're shooting for schools in the top-5, a 175 or above. A stellar LSAT/GPA combo won't be sufficient, either. You will have to devote some serious time and thought to your softs: Your personal statement, résumé, addenda, and letters of recommendation. Of particular importance will be the personal statement and LORs. When you are competing for admission into the top echelons, where everyone has GPAs of 3.9+ and LSATs in the 172+ range, it's the softs that set you apart and make you memorable. Once you're in college, keep the following in mind so that you can create the most appealing law school applicant profile possible: 1. Pick a major that will require a lot of reading- and research-intensive classes. This will not only prepare you for law classes (which themselves are incredibly research- and reading-heavy), but it will also demonstrate to schools, when you apply, that you can handle the academic load of law school. 2. Keep an upward grade trend throughout college. This means that your grades either get stronger as you go through school, or start off strong and remain there for all 4 years of college. Most law schools will want to see GPAs of 3.5 or above (the closer you can get to a 4.0, the better). If you get a B during your freshman year, it's not a deal-breaker; your focus should be to keep your grades as high as you can get them. 3. Take a challenging class load: Intro classes are okay for freshman and (maybe) sophomore year, but once you get to junior and senior year, your focus should be on upper-level classes and seminars that allow you to really hone in and focus on your specific interests within the major. And, as always, keep your grades up throughout. 4. Establish rapport with your professors (particularly during your junior and senior years). You can do this by attending office hours, working for them as a research assistant, and talking to them after class. They will be the ones writing your letters of recommendation, and will only be able to write effective, overwhelmingly positive ones is if they have specific, anecdotal knowledge of you and can favorably compare you to other students in your class. 5. Work on your extracurriculars. Don't worry about being a part of 30 student groups; instead, focus on 2 or 3. Become a part and get involved during your freshman and sophomore years, and then obtain leadership positions in them during your junior and senior years. Another useful thing you can do, regardless of your major choice, is to take formal logic courses (which can be found under the Philosophy Department at the college you end up attending) during your sophomore and junior years; this will help you later as you prepare for the LSAT. I know I gave you a lot of info, but I hope this was helpful! Feel free to reach out if you have any further questions; I'm happy to help! :-)
Kyran Originally Answered: Could I go to the University of pittsburgh for 4 years and then go to an ivy league school to study law?
For only being a junior in high school, you seem to have a good understanding of how law school works. You can absolutely go to a state school (technically, Pitt is 'state related') and then an ivy league or very high-ranked law school. You do not need to attend a fancy undergraduate university to be admitted to an amazing law school. An ivy league education for your bachelor's might give you a small admissions bump when applying to law school, but it's by no means a requirement. Ivy league law schools do prefer ivy league applicants, but GPA is more important. I know many people who attended very mediocre colleges and then went on to fantastic law schools. Good grades from wherever you go, as well as a great LSAT score (Law School Admissions Test), are primarily what determine entrance to law school. So, whichever school you choose, whether it be community and then a four-year or a school like the University of Pittsburgh, just keep your grades as high as possible. By high, I mean 3.8-3.9+. You don't need a GPA that high to go to a high-ranked non-ivy law school. Also, not all ivy league law schools are that great. You should go to NYU (non-ivy) over Cornell (ivy), for example. NYU is a much more prestigious law school. The rank of your law school matters infinitely more than the rank of your undergrad in terms of legal hiring, so go with the cheaper and easier option for college if that's what makes you more comfortable. For law school, though, aim as high as you can.
Kyran Originally Answered: Could I go to the University of pittsburgh for 4 years and then go to an ivy league school to study law?
Yes. Is it the norm that students go to another university for their Grad school. You really should of been going on college visits by now. Start ASAP. Call up admissions and make an appointment to meet with them and take a tour of the campus. meet with the head of the department of your major too if you know what area you want to study. Law is not a major/minor for your undergrad work. You must have a four year Bachelor degree and take the LSAT before you can apply to Law schools. For an ivy, you are going to have to have stellar grades and a high LSAT score. go to your public library and do some research into colleges. they will have a ton of info on all aspects of college.
Kyran Originally Answered: Could I go to the University of pittsburgh for 4 years and then go to an ivy league school to study law?
Yes, that's fine. For law school, you get a Bachelor's degree at a 4 year school, then you apply to law schools.

Kyran Originally Answered: Kobe Earthquake - Natural Hazards GCSE Case Study?
The Japanese government embarked on a major earthquake preparedness campaign, which failed in preparing Japan against the Great Hanshin earthquake. There were signs before the earthquake which were not recognized until afterwards, for instance there were precursors such as chemical changes in the ground water, Radon Gas in Ground Water Wells increases before an earthquake
Kyran Originally Answered: Kobe Earthquake - Natural Hazards GCSE Case Study?
With every day pass, our country is getting into more and more trouble. The inflation, unemployment and falling value of dollar are the main concern for our Government but authorities are just sleeping, they don’t want to face the fact. Media is also involve in it, they are force to stop showing the real economic situation to the people. I start getting more concern about my future as well as my family after watching the response of our Government for the people that affected by hurricane Katrina. According to recent studies made by World Bank, the coming crisis will be far worse than initially predicted. So if you're already preparing for the crisis (or haven't started yet) make sure you watch this video at http://www.familysurvival.tv and discover the 4 BIG issues you'll have to deal with when the crisis hits, and how to solve them fast (before the disaster strikes your town!) without spending $1,000s on overrated items and useless survival books.
Kyran Originally Answered: Kobe Earthquake - Natural Hazards GCSE Case Study?
I am a Fire Rescue Specialist, and I train in these issues, and there are many great articles and link on the FEMA web site. I guess it is under homeland security now. There are also some fire/rescue related sites that have a lot of stories regarding this. I am not sure if this is where you are going with this, but good luck.

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