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A Tale of Two Patients:?

A Tale of Two Patients:? Topic: The sisters analysis
May 26, 2019 / By Norrie
Question: Patient A: Woke early one morning suffering from chest pains. A reasonably fit man in his early fifties, was rushed immediately to the hospital, then air-lifted to a facility with excellent credentials in cardiology, he recieved wonderful treatment and was sent home. He makes a six figure salary and has excellent insurance. Patient B: Woke with chest pains. She called her sister to come and drive her to the local emergency room. She was told that she would be put on a "priority list" (which is a mystery) and then recieve adequate treatment. Eventually, however, she did recieve treatment. She makes a modest living and currently has no health insurance. She is fifty-two. This is a true story (unlike the cat story), what are your opinions of this? Cristobal: I think you missed the point. The Mrs.: Initially, they went to the same hospital. The man was driven by his wife, then air-lifted to another facility. No, of course they do not have the exact same health history. He had insurance, she did not. EDIT- Insurance is not your health history. If he had a history of heart problems or previous heart attacks, and she did not, the actions taken would seem logical. Did she refuse further treatment (such as being air lifted)? Did he demand it? After further analysis did they decide that her symptoms were due to something else? The Mrs.: Neither one of them had a history of heart problems. Neither one of them refused or demanded treatment. They both had heart attacks.
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Best Answers: A Tale of Two Patients:?

Lambart Lambart | 3 days ago
Did they go to the same hospital? Was the ER just as busy at both times? Did they have the exact same health history? How did the man get to the hospital, was he rushed by ambulance or by a friend / relative / himself? There are a lot of unanswered questions here...I am sure there are more than I thought of in 5 seconds. EDIT- Insurance is not your health history. If he had a history of heart problems or previous heart attacks, and she did not, the actions taken would seem logical. Did she refuse further treatment (such as being air lifted)? Did he demand it? After further analysis did they decide that her symptoms were due to something else? EDIT2- Was the woman's less sever than the man's? Sorry, just playing devil's advocate. And trying to show there is typically more to the story than we usually hear.
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Lambart Originally Answered: For leukemia patients and/or survivors.help me analyze my symptoms please?
1. You don't have to have every symptom in the book to have a problem-so you need to get it checked out. 2. It could be something less dramatic that leukemia-so you need to get it checked out to find out what it is. 3. It could be leukemia-so you need to get it checked out. 4. You need to go get it checked out. (I am way to sarcastic tonight to be answering question on Yahoo!) Seriously, these do sound like worrisome symptoms to me, and you have clearly given them some very rational thought. If you were in my family you would be at the docs first thing in the morning. Not that its necessarily leukemia, mind you, but it sounds like something is going on. It could be no more that a viral suppression of part of your bone marrow (that would improve on its own), or it could be more serious. Please go see someone.

Isadore Isadore
Try to put yourself in the doctor's shoes. Take for example the director of the hospital. Patient A is an easy answer. He has insurance to cover the procedures. Come on in, take a seat, let me stick this into your veins, your out cold...work on the heart....etc. He's gone. Take Patient B. Each and every day somebody comes into the hospital without insurance and needs immediate medical care. Thus the list starts to build. The hospital director has to look after the good of the hospital. Most people do not know this, but many hospitals, I was told 25% (but I believe it to be a little lower) of all hospitals close down within 10 years due to insufficient funds. As a doctor, a person has to take the hippocratic oath, an oath that says they will serve each person to the best of their ability. The best of a doctors ability relies on the amount of funding given to the hospital for certain procedures. Now think about the doctor that has to tell this poor woman that she cannot receive treatment because she doesn't have money to pay for it. It is a heartbreaking moment for any doctor. But while the United States (I am assuming you are from the US as many other countries have nationwide health care), does not have nationwide health care plans, the priority list arises. Now I agree that they could come up with a different, maybe more politically correct name than the "priority list". But in practice, there is not much more that the hospital can offer the woman. Working with this situation each and every day, in and out, the doctors and directors become more and more affected by it and try harder and harder not to show it and try to act as if it doesn't bother them, but it does. Trust me, it does.
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Fawke Fawke
i think it's statistically more likely that a man in his early fifties will have a heart attack than a woman of the same age. further, men and women present with slightly different signs and symptoms. mens are usually more acute and diagnosis is easier.
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Cush Cush
it is better to be a man in his early fifties that makes a six figure salary and have excellent insurance than not
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Cush Originally Answered: Greeting patients in the medical office is an example of which type of work?
I think D, because they are simply greeting not scheduling or billing/insurance. It is one of the administrative duties to greet the patients. Hope this helps :)

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