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Why should death penalty be banned?

Why should death penalty be banned? Topic: Case study life after death
July 18, 2019 / By Berry
Question: Hi all i have this debate in my class about this topic and i badly need help my parents are too busy so can u all? plz help me
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Best Answers: Why should death penalty be banned?

Affricah Affricah | 9 days ago
the best place to start is at http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/student-... Click on ideas for research papers and debates. If you have accurate information, you have the easier side of this debate. The death penalty doesn’t reduce crime, prolongs the anguish of families of murder victims, costs a whole lot more than life in prison, and, worst of all, risks executions of innocent people. Details: The worst thing about it. Errors: The system can make tragic mistakes. As of now, 140 wrongly convicted people on death row have been exonerated. We’ll never know for sure how many people have been executed for crimes they didn’t commit. DNA is rarely available in homicides, often irrelevant and can’t guarantee we won’t execute innocent people. Keeping killers off the streets for good: Life without parole, on the books in most states, also prevents reoffending. It means what it says, and spending the rest of your life locked up, knowing you’ll never be free, is no picnic. Two big advantages: -an innocent person serving life can be released from prison -life without parole costs less than the death penalty Costs, a big surprise to many people: Study after study has found that the death penalty is much more expensive than life in prison. The process is much more complex than for any other kind of criminal case. The largest costs come at the pre-trial and trial stages. These apply whether or not the defendant is convicted, let alone sentenced to death. Crime reduction (deterrence): Homicide rates for states that use the death penalty are consistently higher than for those that don’t. The most recent FBI data confirms this. For people without a conscience, fear of being caught is the best deterrent. The death penalty is no more effective in deterring others than life sentences. Who gets it: The death penalty isn't reserved for the worst crimes, but for defendants with the worst lawyers. It doesn't apply to people with money. Practically everyone sentenced to death had to rely on an overworked public defender. Victims: People assume that families of murder victims want the death penalty to be imposed. It isn't necessarily so. Some are against it on moral grounds. But even families who have supported it in principle have testified to the protracted and unavoidable damage that the death penalty process does to families like theirs and that life without parole is an appropriate alternative. It comes down to whether we should keep the death penalty for retribution or revenge. Your opponents will probably rely on these to back up their view.
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Affricah Originally Answered: The death penalty helps society innocent people? The death penalty helps society innocent people? Supporting i?
For the worst crimes, life without parole is better, for many reasons. I’m against the death penalty not because of sympathy for criminals but because it doesn’t reduce crime, prolongs the anguish of families of murder victims, costs a whole lot more than life in prison, and, worst of all, risks executions of innocent people. The worst thing about it. Errors: The system can make tragic mistakes. In 2004, the state of Texas executed Cameron Todd Willingham for starting the fire that killed his children. The Texas Forensic Science Commission found that the arson testimony that led to his conviction was based on flawed science. As of now, 141 wrongly convicted people on death row have been exonerated. We’ll never know for sure how many people have been executed for crimes they didn’t commit. DNA is rarely available in homicides, often irrelevant (as in Willingham's case) and can’t guarantee we won’t execute innocent people. Keeping killers off the streets for good: Life without parole, on the books in most states, also prevents reoffending. It means what it says, and spending the rest of your life locked up, knowing you’ll never be free, is no picnic. Two big advantages: -an innocent person serving life can be released from prison -life without parole costs less than the death penalty Costs, a big surprise to many people: Study after study has found that the death penalty is much more expensive than life in prison. The process is much more complex than for any other kind of criminal case. The largest costs come at the pre-trial and trial stages. These apply whether or not the defendant is convicted, let alone sentenced to death. Crime reduction (deterrence): Homicide rates for states that use the death penalty are consistently higher than for those that don’t. The most recent FBI data confirms this. For people without a conscience, fear of being caught is the best deterrent. The death penalty is no more effective in deterring others than life sentences. Who gets it: The death penalty magnifies social and economic inequalities. It isn't reserved for the worst crimes, but for defendants with the worst lawyers. It doesn't apply to people with money. Practically everyone sentenced to death had to rely on an overworked public defender. Victims: Like no other punishment, it puts families of murder victims through a process which makes healing even harder. Even families who have supported it in principle have testified to the protracted and unavoidable damage that the death penalty process does to families like theirs and that life without parole is an appropriate alternative. It comes down to whether we should keep the death penalty for retribution or revenge.

Thom Thom
It serves no purpose. The US has a high homicide rate despite the punishment being death. Countries without the death penalty have lower rates. For instance the US has 4 times the intentional homicide rate of almost every country in Europe. The only nation with a comparable rate - Belarus - also has the death penalty. It is more expensive than imprisoning people for life - to execute someone you need several lengthy appeals. These are almost all paid for by the state as they are very expensive. Even if the possibility of a miscarriage of justice is small it is still there. You can release someone after 40 years of wrongful imprisonment, you can't resurrect them.
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Quin Quin
The only punishment invoked by the death penalty is the anxiety that shows up on the day of execution. Then it's brief and over. I understand that they have their life taken away, but usually they have plenty of time to work through that before it happens. No one wants to die, but these people don't value life enough to be too influenced by that. Attend an execution, you don't see them kicking and screaming and howling and "oh, please don't kill me!" They march in and they die. That is not a deterrent. I believe that someone who commits a heinous crime should be put away, and reminded every day that they chose to do something that put them there. I also believe that for a life sentence as a result of such a heinous crime, they give up their right to live comfortably. Simple cell, simple food, no TV, no radio, no "yard time". The only reading material should be about their crime, news articles, magazine articles, maybe the transcript from the trial, and one wall of the cell, should be reserved for the victim's photograph when they were discovered. For life without chance of parole. Killing someone who kills is sending the message that killing is the solution for your problems, and I don't want society killing in my name, either in the gas chamber or on the battlefield. Very rarely do I believe war is justified.
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Malcom Malcom
i believe in the death penalty. BUT, first you must be 1000% positive the person is guilty. to many innocent people on death row. also too many people are on death row for way to long. punishment should be swift.
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Jerald Jerald
Biggest reason that you can center your whole argument on for why it should be banned is.....what lesson are we teaching these people or are society by killing them for killing another person its injustice
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Gerrard Gerrard
no, some people, by their actions, give up the right to be considered human ex) someone who raped and killed a child
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Gerrard Originally Answered: Death Penalty?
Good question. The application of the death penalty is arbitrary. For example, when is the last time a wealthy person faced the death penalty? For background, here are answers to questions about practical aspects of the death penalty, with sources listed below. What about the risk of executing innocent people? 124 people on death rows have been released with evidence of their innocence. Doesn't DNA keep new cases like these from happening? DNA is available in less than 10% of all homicides. It is not a guarantee against the execution of innocent people. Doesn't the death penalty prevent others from committing murder? No reputable study shows the death penalty to be a deterrent. To be a deterrent a punishment must be sure and swift. The death penalty is neither. Homicide rates are higher in states and regions that have it than in states that do not. So, what are the alternatives? Life without parole is now on the books in 48 states. It means what it says. It is sure and swift and rarely appealed. Life without parole is less expensive than the death penalty. But isn't the death penalty cheaper than keeping criminals in prison? The death penalty costs much more than life in prison, mostly because of the legal process. Anytime the death penalty is a possible sentence, extra costs start to mount up even before a trial, continuing through the uniquely complicated trial (actually 2 separate stages, mandated by the Supreme Court) in death penalty cases, and subsequent appeals. What about the very worst crimes? The death penalty isn’t reserved for the “worst of the worst,” but rather for defendants with the worst lawyers. When is the last time a wealthy person was sentenced to death, let alone executed?? Doesn't the death penalty help families of murder victims? Not necessarily. Murder victim family members across the country argue that the drawn-out death penalty process is painful for them and that life without parole is an appropriate alternative. So, why don't we speed up the process? Over 50 of the innocent people released from death row had already served over a decade. If the process is speeded up we are sure to execute an innocent person.

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