3531 Shares

Can Anyone Help Me with This Quadratic Equation?

Can Anyone Help Me with This Quadratic Equation? Topic: Problem solving with large numbers
April 19, 2019 / By Paisley
Question: Right now I'm studying quadratic equations and am badly in need of some help with this problem! Any and all responses are greatly appreciated:) Suppose you are an event coordinator for a large performance theater. One of the hottest new Broadway musicals has started to tour, and your city is the first stop on the tour. You need to supply information about projected ticket sales to the box office manager. The box office manager uses this information to anticipate staffing needs until the tickets sell out. You provide the manager with a quadratic equation that models the expected number of ticket sales for each day x. ( is the day tickets go on sale). a. Does the graph of this equation open up or down? How did you determine this? b. Describe what happens to the tickets sales as time passes? c. Use the quadratic equation to determine the last day that tickets will be sold. (Note: Write your answer in terms of the number of days after ticket sales begin.) d. Will tickets peak or be at a low during the middle of the sale? How do you know? e. After how many days will the peak or low occur? f. How many tickets will be sold on the day when the peak or low occurs? g. What is the point of the vertex? How does this number relate to your answers in parts e and f? h. How many solutions are there to the equation ? How do you know? i. What do the solutions represent? Is there a solution that does not make sense? If so, in what ways does the solution not make sense?
Best Answer

Best Answers: Can Anyone Help Me with This Quadratic Equation?

Marcelyn Marcelyn | 4 days ago
You've left out the equation. I've answered this question several times already, so here you go. -0.2x^2+12x+11 a. It opens down because the coefficient of x^2 is negative. b. The sales will increase, reach a peak, and then decrease. c. Set -0.2x^2+12x+11 = 0 and solve for x. The last day will be the larger of the two numbers. d. Peak. The parabola opens down, so that means there will be a maximum. e. Find the vertex of the parabola. The x-coordinate represents when the peak will occur. f. The y-coordinate of the vertex represents how many tickets will be sold on the day of the peak. g. Answered in parts e and f. h. Two. You should have found them both in part c. i. I didn't solve the equation, but if one of your solutions was negative, then this would not make sense because you don't don't about how many negative days have passed. Here is a link to the search results where you can find different versions of the answers. Some are correct; some are not. http://answers.yahoo.com/search/search_r...
👍 136 | 👎 4
Did you like the answer? Can Anyone Help Me with This Quadratic Equation? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: Problem solving with large numbers


Marcelyn Originally Answered: Can Anyone Help Me with This Quadratic Equation?
You've left out the equation. I've answered this question several times already, so here you go. -0.2x^2+12x+11 a. It opens down because the coefficient of x^2 is negative. b. The sales will increase, reach a peak, and then decrease. c. Set -0.2x^2+12x+11 = 0 and solve for x. The last day will be the larger of the two numbers. d. Peak. The parabola opens down, so that means there will be a maximum. e. Find the vertex of the parabola. The x-coordinate represents when the peak will occur. f. The y-coordinate of the vertex represents how many tickets will be sold on the day of the peak. g. Answered in parts e and f. h. Two. You should have found them both in part c. i. I didn't solve the equation, but if one of your solutions was negative, then this would not make sense because you don't don't about how many negative days have passed. Here is a link to the search results where you can find different versions of the answers. Some are correct; some are not. http://answers.yahoo.com/search/search_r...
Marcelyn Originally Answered: Can Anyone Help Me with This Quadratic Equation?
good the components for fixing an quadratic equation is -b + - the rectangular root of b squared + four x A rewrite the equation like this 8x + x -five 8x=A x=b and -five is c -x + and minus x to the moment vigor + four x eight x -five be squared equals 8x8 that is sixty four + four x a x -five a confident 20 x X 20 x one million is 20 the rectangular root of 20 is four.forty seven + -eight = -three.fifty three then minus is is eleven.fifty three so you've 2 solutions eleven.fifty three confident and -three.fifty three poor quantity thats how i do quadratic equations I dont recognise if its proper you would wish to verify with any individual who is aware of extra approximately the stuff like a math trainer

Kingsley Kingsley
good the components for fixing an quadratic equation is -b + - the rectangular root of b squared + four x A rewrite the equation like this 8x + x -five 8x=A x=b and -five is c -x + and minus x to the moment vigor + four x eight x -five be squared equals 8x8 that is sixty four + four x a x -five a confident 20 x X 20 x one million is 20 the rectangular root of 20 is four.forty seven + -eight = -three.fifty three then minus is is eleven.fifty three so you've 2 solutions eleven.fifty three confident and -three.fifty three poor quantity thats how i do quadratic equations I dont recognise if its proper you would wish to verify with any individual who is aware of extra approximately the stuff like a math trainer
👍 50 | 👎 -3

Kingsley Originally Answered: When are quadratic equations used in real life?
Yes, missiles and other projectiles under the influence of gravity (or some other accelerating agent), will follow a parabolic trajectory (if we ignore air resistance and some other factors). For example, at time t, the vertical height of an object launched into the air will be: x(t) = (1/2)*g*t^2 + v0*t + x0 where t represents the time since the object was launched, g represents the acceleration due to gravity, v0 represents the objects initial vertical velocity, and x0 represents the objects initial vertical height. For more information, try searching for "projectile motion," "free-fall motion," "trajectory," etc.
Kingsley Originally Answered: When are quadratic equations used in real life?
Satellite dishes are parabola shaped Revenue = number of units sold times price per unit; this can result in a quadratic.

If you have your own answer to the question problem solving with large numbers, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.